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I know this is possible, and there are various ways to do it, but is there any good reason NOT to create a tag from multiple revisions?

What I am proposing to do is create a program based on the SVNKit and Jakarta POI that reads a list of build artifacts from an excel spreadsheet / CSV file (a mix of java class files and other stuff) at various svn revisions, creates a TAG out of it, and this TAG is what becomes the next proposed release.

I like this approach because:

  1. We have some documentation (a baseline if you will) detailing exactly what is going into each release.

  2. It gives our release manager something to do (without simply checking out the head or having to learn about complicated things like branching and merging)

  3. Developers can check-in whatever they want when they want without being constricted by any such concept as a 'release window'. I.e. restricting developers from checking in just prior to a release.

I distrust this approach because:

It feels like I'm violating basic svn principles (although I'm not sure what).

It is because of niggling doubt that I'm putting this idea out there for people to kick the tires so to speak. What do you guys think?

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How would you do this? Create a tag off a working copy or something? –  Sander Rijken Feb 8 '11 at 23:15
    
yes :) but I'd need to create the working copy first based on the contents of the spreadsheet. I'm thinking to use SVNKit and Jakarta POI to automate this process. –  John Deverall Feb 9 '11 at 0:14
    
I am confused by this: "It gives our release manager something to do" By release manager you mean a person? He does not currently have any work to do and you want to create some for him? (No offense meant, I just want to understand your motivation) –  Suma Feb 25 '11 at 9:20
    
In order for our release manager to manage our release at the moment (which is currently the head), they tend to manage the developers. This is because the developers control where the head is and therefore where the release is at. I guess what I mean by 'giving our release manager something to do' is that I'm giving the release manager something to do other than manage the developers' commits. We could Branch our releases but it seems more complex in a lot of cases than pinning back revisions when it comes to a merge. –  John Deverall Mar 1 '11 at 21:27
    
Even when not using branching, if you just want to capture the exact state of the head, all you need to is write down the revision number (or you could do a tag, but that is a wee bit more complex) and do the build (and all related SVN operations) with that numbers. What you are doing is not "wrong" (it is your repository, feel free to do whatever with it as it suits you) but to me it "smells". I might be missing something, but from what I understood so far it seems to be you are implementing a complex functionality for something which could be really very simple. –  Suma Mar 2 '11 at 7:11

2 Answers 2

You're not violating any svn principles by doing this. Tag is not an inbuilt subversion construct, just a convention that people use to aid with the build process. Normally people would want their tags to be based off a single revision, but again that is only convention. Do you really have a situation where the good code to ship consists of historical versions of some files but current versions of others?

If this approach works for you, then go for it. However, to avoid confusion for anyone used to the normal definition of 'tags', perhaps you could call the directory something else? "Builds" perhaps?

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Hi xorsyst, yes we do actually have a situation where the good code to ship consists of historical versions. This is because we have a verification / documentation / test cycle which takes months. –  John Deverall Mar 1 '11 at 4:39
    
I'll add, as developers we can end up working several revisions in advance of where the current release or even release candidate is at :) –  John Deverall Mar 1 '11 at 4:46

Developers can check-in whatever they want when they want without being constricted by any such concept as a 'release window'. I.e. restricting developers from checking in just prior to a release.

The traditional SVN way to do this is to always work in a branch, never in a trunk. This way you can commit whenever you wish, you just will not merge into a trunk in the "release window" (when the trunk is "frozen")

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Hi Suma, thank you for this. I'm trying to avoid merging if possible because of its complexity. It is a lot easier (if dependencies are managed) to dial up a drop down combo box in a table of versioned artifacts to the most recent revision rather than manually merge two source files. :) –  John Deverall Mar 1 '11 at 21:39

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