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When I run Powershell's get-childitem on a directory (or any cmdlet that returns file system items), it showsa column called Mode, like this:

    Directory: C:\MyDirectory


Mode                LastWriteTime     Length Name
----                -------------     ------ ----
d----          2/8/2011  10:55 AM            Directory1
d----          2/8/2011  10:54 AM            Directory2
d----          2/8/2011  10:54 AM            Directory3
-ar--          2/8/2011  10:54 AM        454 File1.txt
-ar--          2/8/2011  10:54 AM       4342 File2.txt

I searched and searched Google and my local Powershell book, but could not find any documentation on the meaning of the Mode column.

What are the possible values of the Mode column and what does each one mean?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Note that the mode you see is just a string representation of a bitfield enum that hides in the Attributes property. You can figure out what the individual letters mean by simply showing both side by side:

PS> gci|select mode,attributes -u

Mode               Attributes
----               ----------
d----               Directory
d-r--     ReadOnly, Directory
d---- Directory, ReparsePoint
-a---                 Archive

In any case, the full list is:

d - Directory
a - Archive
r - Read-only
h - Hidden
s - System
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Imho the most explanatory is the code itself:

if (instance == null)
{
    return string.Empty;
}
FileSystemInfo baseObject = (FileSystemInfo) instance.BaseObject;
if (baseObject == null)
{
    return string.Empty;
}
string str = "";
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.Directory) == FileAttributes.Directory)
{
    str = str + "d";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.Archive) == FileAttributes.Archive)
{
    str = str + "a";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.ReadOnly) == FileAttributes.ReadOnly)
{
    str = str + "r";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.Hidden) == FileAttributes.Hidden)
{
    str = str + "h";
}
else
{
    str = str + "-";
}
if ((baseObject.Attributes & FileAttributes.System) == FileAttributes.System)
{
    return (str + "s");
}
return (str + "-");
share|improve this answer
    
Huh? Where did you get the code? –  Aaron Jensen Feb 9 '11 at 0:10
    
@splattered: Reflector from the PowerShell assemblies, I guess. –  Joey Feb 9 '11 at 0:14
    
Yes, great, sweet Reflector. –  stej Feb 9 '11 at 0:25
2  
As a side note: the full list of Attributes is way bigger than the five flags shows in the mode column, and they're property filled out on the objects. Try this: [Enum]::GetValues("System.IO.FileAttributes") ... –  Jaykul Feb 9 '11 at 3:04

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