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I've got a method that gets a grade from a table for a student. If there are no records (null result set) then it should return false.

Do I write a function that returns a boolean (is found, is not found) and an integer as a reference parameter?

This is what I have so far (I return a -1 from the proc if the record isn't found)

public static int getParticipationGrade(SqlConnection sqlConn, int enrollmentID)
{
    SqlCommand sqlCmd = new SqlCommand("dbo.usp_participation_byEnrollmentID_Select", sqlConn);
    sqlCmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    sqlCmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@enrollmentID", enrollmentID);

    int ret = 0;
    sqlConn.Open();
    ret = (int)sqlCmd.ExecuteScalar();
    sqlConn.Close();
    return ret;
}
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1  
Yes, an int as a ref parameter makes sense -- it would be fairly analogous to Dictionary.TryGetValue. –  Kirk Woll Feb 8 '11 at 23:56
1  
does it HAVE to return false if there is no record? can the calling method check for a -1 return value? –  vlad Feb 8 '11 at 23:56
    
Hi, not related to your main question... you can put the declaration of the SqlCommand in a using statement and you can create a command simply doing sqlConn.CreateCommand :) –  Davide Piras Feb 8 '11 at 23:58

4 Answers 4

Using your code as the example, I would do something like:

public bool TryGetParticipationGrade(SqlConnection sqlConn, out int enrollmentID)
{
    SqlCommand sqlCmd = new SqlCommand("dbo.usp_participation_byEnrollmentID_Select", sqlConn);
    sqlCmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    sqlCmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@enrollmentID", enrollmentID);

    sqlConn.Open();
    enrollmentId = (int)sqlCmd.ExecuteScalar();
    sqlConn.Close();
    return enrollmentId != -1;        
}

Usage:

int enrollmentId;
if (TryGetParticipationGrade(sqlConn, out enrollmentId))
{
    // perform success tasks
}
else
{
    // perform fail tasks
}
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+1 because the method follows the practice of the Dictionary.TryGet(). I personally like this better than creating a nullable reference to an int. –  IAbstract Feb 9 '11 at 0:14
    
Okay so the proc should return -1 if not found. Gotcha. –  Caveatrob Feb 9 '11 at 3:47

I would return int? where null meant not found.

public static int? getParticipationGrade(SqlConnection sqlConn, int enrollmentID)
{
    SqlCommand sqlCmd = new SqlCommand("dbo.usp_participation_byEnrollmentID_Select", sqlConn); 
    sqlCmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure; sqlCmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@enrollmentID", enrollmentID); 
    int ret = 0; 
    sqlConn.Open(); 
    ret = (int)sqlCmd.ExecuteScalar(); 
    sqlConn.Close(); 
    return ret < 0 ? (int?) null : ret;
} 
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This is definitely the best choise. –  Snowbear Feb 8 '11 at 23:59
    
How would I have to change my code to do that? Would the local int have to also be int? –  Caveatrob Feb 8 '11 at 23:59
    
@Caveatrob Not necessarily, but you have to ensure that the method returns a nullable int. –  Dan J Feb 9 '11 at 0:01
1  
Why create a nullable reference to an int? Use the out param modifier as we see in so many Microsoft classes, e.g. Dictionary.TryGet() - as @Luke suggest. –  IAbstract Feb 9 '11 at 0:16

I think the syntax of "GetParticipationGrade" implies that its return value should be the grade itself. It seems to make sense to return an invalid value, such as -1 or NULL (as per the other answers, and that would be my choice as well*), and then check to ensure the grade is valid.

That's all convention, of course, but you'd only expect a Boolean return from a method like TryParse(), for example.

*To explain, I would prefer int? to a sentinel grade like -1, because nullable value types are built (HasValue property) for the sort of check you want to do.

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You could have the method return an object, then test to see what the type is, but that isn't generally a good idea. What would probably be better would be to return a nullable int int?, then check the HasValue property. Have the method return null if nothing is found, and return an integer if it is found.

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1  
I almost downvoted this when I read the first line. You might reverse the order in which you make recommendations. :-) –  Cody Gray Feb 9 '11 at 0:05

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