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I want to check if a string is in a txt-file. If it is, do X. If it's not, do Y. However, this code always returns True for some reason. Anyone who see what is wrong?

 def check():
        datafile = file('example.txt')
        found = False
        for line in datafile:
            if blabla in line:
                found = True
                break

check()
if True:
    print "true"
else:
    print "false"
share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 58 down vote accepted

The reason why you always got True has already been given, so I'll just offer another suggestion:

If your file is not too large, you can read it into a string, and just use that (easier and often faster than reading and checking line per line):

if 'blabla' in open('example.txt').read():
    print "true"

Another trick: you can alleviate the possible memory problems by using mmap.mmap() to create a "string-like" object that uses the underlying file (instead of reading the whole file in memory):

import mmap
f = open('example.txt')
s = mmap.mmap(f.fileno(), 0, access=mmap.ACCESS_READ)
if s.find('blabla') != -1:
    print 'true'

NOTE: in python 3, mmaps behave like bytearray objects rather than strings, so the subsequence you look for with find() has to be a bytes object rather than a string as well, eg. s.find(b'blabla')

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9  
This is brilliant! This is exactly why I love stackoverflow: it doesn't just give you a solution, it gives you a better option. Thanks :) –  JCBK Feb 9 '11 at 22:23
    
The second solution does not give the same results as 'blabla' in open('example.txt').read() in my python 2.7 –  xApple Mar 18 '13 at 11:04
1  
Strange, it does work with s.find('blabla') (check for -1). I could swear it used to work with in as well... But it seems now that in only works for single characters... –  Steven Mar 18 '13 at 11:34
    
import mmap f = open('example.txt') s = mmap.mmap(f.fileno(), 0, access=mmap.ACCESS_READ) if 'blabla' in s: print 'true' ====> THIS DOES NOT WORK ! IT ALWAYS RETURN FALSE –  begueradj Jun 5 at 15:51
    
if 'blabla' in open('example.txt').read(): print "true" ==> How can we close example.txt file in this case ? –  Begueradj Jun 12 at 8:11

As Jeffrey Said, you are not checking the value of check(). In addition, your check() function is not returning anything. Note the difference:

def check():
        datafile = file('example.txt')
        found = False #this isn't really necessary 
        for line in datafile:
            if blabla in line:
                #found = True #not necessary 
                return True
        return False #because you finished the search without finding anything


print check()
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if True:
    print "true"

This always happens because True is always True.

You want something like this:

if check():
    print "true"
else:
    print "false"

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
I see, it works now. Seems a bit weird to me though, this means that Python says "a module is True, unless stated otherwise". So if I'd make an empty module, it'd always be true? Interesting :) –  JCBK Feb 9 '11 at 0:15
3  
No, not at all - nothing to do with modules. You were simply checking whether True was true, which it is. –  Daniel Roseman Feb 9 '11 at 0:17

Your check function should return the found boolean and use that to determine what to print.

def check():
        datafile = file('example.txt')
        found = False
        for line in datafile:
            if blabla in line:
                found = True
                break

        return found

found = check()
if found:
    print "true"
else:
    print "false"

the second block could also be condensed to:

if check():
    print "true"
else:
    print "false"
share|improve this answer
    
All the above answers are dramatically FALSE except yours. I spent half a day to guess what is happening with the answer they validated while it is totally WRONG. Only yours worked for me –  begueradj Jun 5 at 16:02

Here's another way to possibly answer your question using the find function which gives you a literal numerical value of where something truly is

open('file', 'r').read().find('')

in find write the word you want to find and 'file' stands for your file name

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How to search the text in the file and Returns an file path in which the word is found (Как искать часть текста в файле и возвращять путь к файлу в котором это слово найдено)

import os
import re

class Searcher:
    def __init__(self, path, query):
        self.path   = path

        if self.path[-1] != '/':
            self.path += '/'

        self.path = self.path.replace('/', '\\')
        self.query  = query
        self.searched = {}

    def find(self):
        for root, dirs, files in os.walk( self.path ):
            for file in files:
                if re.match(r'.*?\.txt$', file) is not None:
                    if root[-1] != '\\':
                        root += '\\'           
                    f = open(root + file, 'rt')
                    txt = f.read()
                    f.close()

                    count = len( re.findall( self.query, txt ) )
                    if count > 0:
                        self.searched[root + file] = count

    def getResults(self):
        return self.searched

In Main()

# -*- coding: UTF-8 -*-

import sys
from search import Searcher

path = 'c:\\temp\\'
search = 'search string'


if __name__ == '__main__':

    if len(sys.argv) == 3:
        # создаем объект поисковика и передаем ему аргументы
        Search = Searcher(sys.argv[1], sys.argv[2])
    else:
        Search = Searcher(path, search)

    # начать поиск
    Search.find()

    # получаем результат
    results = Search.getResults()

    # выводим результат
    print 'Found ', len(results), ' files:'

    for file, count in results.items():
        print 'File: ', file, ' Found entries:' , count
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If you have a question about this topic that isn't answered by this Q&A, please make a new question in the top-right corner. –  Sumurai8 Aug 23 '13 at 8:08

Two problems:

  1. Your function does not return anything; a function that does not explicitly return anything returns None (which is falsy)

  2. True is always True - you are not checking the result of your function

.

def check(fname, txt):
    with open(fname) as dataf:
        return any(txt in line for line in dataf)

if check('example.txt', 'blabla'):
    print "true"
else:
    print "false"
share|improve this answer

found = False

def check():
    datafile = file('example.txt')
    for line in datafile:
        if blabla in line:
            found = True
            break
    return found

if check():
    print "true"
else:
    print "false"
share|improve this answer
    
No need to call check() twice... –  Steven Feb 9 '11 at 12:29
    
typo. thanks. fixed. –  karlcow Feb 9 '11 at 15:31

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