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I'm interested in becoming more fluent in Java so I have been going through Sun/Oracle's java tutorial. I'm on the section of implementing interfaces and I do not understand the code they have given as a solution to one of the exercises.

The exercise was to implement the java.lang.CharSequence interface, the implementation should return the string backwards, and to write a small main method to test your class; make sure to call all four methods.

This was a a little overwhelming so I began to work through their solution to see if I could understand the concepts and their code. Here are my questions:

1) When they implement the charAt method, the are returning an invocation of the charAt method, why doesn't this cause some sort of infinite loop?

Thanks in advance.

Here is the code:

/* Copyright (c) 1995, 2008, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. */
// CharSequenceDemo presents a String value -- backwards.
public class CharSequenceDemo implements CharSequence {
    private String s;

    public CharSequenceDemo(String s) {
        //It would be much more efficient to just reverse the string
        //in the constructor. But a lot less fun!
        this.s = s;
    }

    //If the string is backwards, the end is the beginning!
    private int fromEnd(int i) {
        return s.length() - 1 - i;
    }

    public char charAt(int i) {
        if ((i < 0) || (i >= s.length())) {
        throw new StringIndexOutOfBoundsException(i);
        }
        return s.charAt(fromEnd(i));
    }

    public int length() {
        return s.length();
    }

    public CharSequence subSequence(int start, int end) {
        if (start < 0) {
        throw new StringIndexOutOfBoundsException(start);
        }
        if (end > s.length()) {
        throw new StringIndexOutOfBoundsException(end);
        }
        if (start > end) {
        throw new StringIndexOutOfBoundsException(start - end);
        }
        StringBuilder sub = 
        new StringBuilder(s.subSequence(fromEnd(end), fromEnd(start)));
        return sub.reverse();
    }

    public String toString() {
        StringBuilder s = new StringBuilder(this.s);
        return s.reverse().toString();
    }

    //Random int from 0 to max.
    private static int random(int max) {
        return (int) Math.round(Math.random() * max + 0.5);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        CharSequenceDemo s =
        new CharSequenceDemo("Write a class that implements the CharSequence interface found in the java.lang package.");

        //exercise charAt() and length()
        for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        System.out.println(s.charAt(i));
        }

        //exercise subSequence() and length();
        int start = random(s.length() - 1);
        int end = random(s.length() - 1 - start) + start;
        System.out.println(s.subSequence(start, end));

        //exercise toString();
        System.out.println(s);

    }
}
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1) When they implement the charAt method, the are returning an invocation of the charAt method, why doesn't this cause some sort of infinite loop?

There's no infinite loop because the methods refer to two entirely different objects.

The interface defines the charAt() signature for a CharSequence. The implementation in this case has a backing String instance. The implementation for the CharSequence calls the charAt() method for the backing String instance. No infinite loop, because it's not calling this.charAt().

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So the s.charAt(fromEnd(i)) is actually calling the charAt method from java.lang.String because s is a String object? –  ProfessionalAmateur Feb 9 '11 at 0:42
    
Yes, that's right. –  duffymo Feb 9 '11 at 0:50
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The nested call to charAt is to s.charAt which means you are invoking the same method but on another object. No infinite loop there.

Their fromEnd is defined as

  private int fromEnd(int i) {
        return s.length() - 1 - i;
    }

almost at the top.

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If I changed the variable name from this: CharSequenceDemo s = new CharSequenceDemo("Write a class that implements the CharSequence interface found in the java.lang package."); to this CharSequenceDemo varString = new CharSequenceDemo("Write a class that implements the CharSequence interface found in the java.lang package."); I would only need to change what is contained within my main method correct? I think maybe because they have s used twice its confusing me, or am I off base? –  ProfessionalAmateur Feb 9 '11 at 0:49
    
s.charAt() is calling the String objects charAt(), not the same method as you claim. –  Austyn Mahoney Feb 9 '11 at 1:19
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  1. The charAt is not actually recursive, it is calling the charAt method of the String class for String s.
  2. fromEnd(i) is a method call to the fromEnd(int i) method that is also defined in your class

-

//If the string is backwards, the end is the beginning!
    private int fromEnd(int i) {
        return s.length() - 1 - i;
    }
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