Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to create a String.replaceAll() method in JavaScript and I'm thinking that using a RegEx would be most terse way to do it. However, I can't figure out how to pass a variable in to a RegEx. I can do this already which will replace all the instances of "B" with "A".

"ABABAB".replace(/B/g, "A");

But I want to do something like this:

String.prototype.replaceAll = function(replaceThis, withThis) {
    this.replace(/replaceThis/g, withThis);
};

But obviously this will only replace the text "replaceThis"...so how do I pass this variable in to my RegEx string?

share|improve this question

15 Answers 15

up vote 582 down vote accepted

Instead of using the /regex/g syntax, you can construct a new RegExp object:

var re = new RegExp("regex","g");

You can dynamically create regex objects this way. Then you will do:

"mystring".replace(re, "newstring");
share|improve this answer
106  
If you need to use an expression like /\/word\:\w*$/, be sure to escape your backslashes: new RegExp( '\\/word\\:\\w*$' ). –  Jonathan Swinney Nov 9 '10 at 23:04
    
Right, +1 Jonathan –  Eric Wendelin Nov 10 '10 at 15:09
1  
@gravityboy You can do ('' + myNumber).replace(/10/g, 'a') or if you want hex numbers, you can do parseInt('' + myNumber, 16) to convert to hex from decimal. –  Eric Wendelin Jun 21 '11 at 15:19
4  
Full escape explanation: stackoverflow.com/a/6969486/151312 –  CoolAJ86 Jun 3 '12 at 1:33
3  
The question suggests that the RegEx is only used to do a constant string replacement. So this is answer is wrong as it would fail if the string contains RegEx meta characters. Sad it is voted this high, will make many headaches... –  dronus Feb 12 '14 at 20:32
this.replace( new RegExp( replaceThis, 'g' ), withThis );
share|improve this answer

This:

var txt=new RegExp(pattern,attributes);

is equivalent to this:

var txt=/pattern/attributes;

See http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_obj_regexp.asp.

share|improve this answer
1  
yep, but in first example it uses pattern as variable, in 2nd as a string –  vladkras Jul 9 '13 at 4:16

As Eric Wendelin mentioned, you can do something like this:

str1 = "pattern"
var re = new RegExp(str1, "g");
"pattern matching .".replace(re, "regex");

This yields "regex matching .". However, it will fail if str1 is ".". You'd expect the result to be "pattern matching regex", replacing the period with "regex", but it'll turn out to be...

regexregexregexregexregexregexregexregexregexregexregexregexregexregexregexregexregexregex

This is because, although "." is a String, in the RegExp constructor it's still interpreted as a regular expression, meaning any non-line-break character, meaning every character in the string. For this purpose, the following function may be useful:

 RegExp.quote = function(str) {
     return str.replace(/([.?*+^$[\]\\(){}|-])/g, "\\$1");
 };

Then you can do:

str1 = "."
var re = new RegExp(RegExp.quote(str1), "g");
"pattern matching .".replace(re, "regex");

yielding "pattern matching regex".

share|improve this answer
1  
You know that the first parameter to replace can be a normal string and don't have to be a regexp? str1 = "."; alert("pattern matching .".replace(str1, "string")); –  some Jan 30 '09 at 10:31
    
@some: of course. That's because the above example is trivial. When you need to search for or replace a pattern combined with a regular string, do str.match(new RegExp("https?://" + RegExp.escape(myDomainName)), for instance. It's annoying that the escape function is not built in. –  Gracenotes Jan 30 '09 at 19:57
    
(continued) Plus, apparentl JC Grubbs required a global replace; implementing a global replace with String.replace(String, String) could be slow for large input. I'm just saying, the top two solutions are buggy, and will fail unexpected on certain input. –  Gracenotes Jan 30 '09 at 20:00
2  
developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Guide/… offers a similar function, but they exclude -, and include =!:/. –  chbrown Dec 15 '12 at 21:12

While you can make dynamically-created RegExp's (as per the other responses to this question), I'll echo my comment from a similar post: The functional form of String.replace() is extremely useful and in many cases reduces the need for dynamically-created RegExp objects. (which are kind of a pain 'cause you have to express the input to the RegExp constructor as a string rather than use the slashes /[A-Z]+/ regexp literal format)

share|improve this answer

"ABABAB".replace(/B/g, "A");

As always: don't use regex unless you have to. For a simple string replace, the idiom is:

'ABABAB'.split('B').join('A')

Then you don't have to worry about the quoting issues mentioned in Gracenotes's answer.

share|improve this answer
2  
Cool idea, wouldn't have thought of doing that! –  devios May 31 '12 at 19:01
    
Hey, thanks for this! What a simple solution! –  user416527 Jan 2 '13 at 0:51
3  
And have you measured that this is faster than regex? –  Mitar Apr 10 '13 at 3:12
1  
This seems preferable, especially when needing to match on special regex characters like '.' –  Chris Apr 24 '13 at 18:41
3  
@PacMan--: both split and replace can take either a string or a RegExp object. The problem that replace has that split doesn't is that when you use a string you only get a single replacement. –  bobince Jun 13 '13 at 9:05
String.prototype.replaceAll = function (replaceThis, withThis) {
   var re = new RegExp(replaceThis,"g"); 
   return this.replace(re, withThis);
};
var aa = "abab54..aba".replaceAll("\\.", "v");

Test with this tool

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the Tool Link... –  Tareq Jan 26 '12 at 9:37

For anyone looking to use variable with the match method, this worked for me

var baz = "foo";

var filter = new RegExp(baz + "d");

"food fight".match(filter)[0]; // food
share|improve this answer
1  
That's a really helpful example, thanks. –  Andrew Apr 3 '13 at 14:59

Here's another replaceAll implementation:

    String.prototype.replaceAll = function (stringToFind, stringToReplace) {
        if ( stringToFind == stringToReplace) return this;
        var temp = this;
        var index = temp.indexOf(stringToFind);
        while (index != -1) {
            temp = temp.replace(stringToFind, stringToReplace);
            index = temp.indexOf(stringToFind);
        }
        return temp;
    };
share|improve this answer

To satisfy my need to insert a variable/alias/function into a Regular Expression, this is what I came up with:

oldre = /xx\(""\)/;
function newre(e){
    return RegExp(e.toString().replace(/\//g,"").replace(/xx/g, yy), "g")
};

String.prototype.replaceAll = this.replace(newre(oldre), "withThis");

where 'oldre' is the original regexp that I want to insert a variable, 'xx' is the placeholder for that variable/alias/function, and 'yy' is the actual variable name, alias, or function.

share|improve this answer

You can use this if $1 not work with you

var pattern = new RegExp("amman","i");
"abc Amman efg".replace(pattern,"<b>"+"abc Amman efg".match(pattern)[0]+"</b>");
share|improve this answer

You can always use indexOf repeatedly:

String.prototype.replaceAll = function(substring, replacement) {
    var result = '';
    var lastIndex = 0;

    while(true) {
        var index = this.indexOf(substring, lastIndex);
        if(index === -1) break;
        result += this.substring(lastIndex, index) + replacement;
        lastIndex = index + substring.length;
    }

    return result + this.substring(lastIndex);
};

This doesn’t go into an infinite loop when the replacement contains the match.

share|improve this answer
String.prototype.replaceAll = function(a, b) {
    return this.replace(new RegExp(a.replace(/([.?*+^$[\]\\(){}|-])/ig, "\\$1"), 'ig'), b)
}

Test it like:

var whatever = 'Some [b]random[/b] text in a [b]sentence.[/b]'

console.log(whatever.replaceAll("[", "<").replaceAll("]", ">"))
share|improve this answer

You want to build the regular expression dynamically and for this the proper solutuion is to use the new RegExp(string) constructor. In order for constructor to treat special characters literally, you must escape them. There is a built-in function in jQuery UI autocomplete widget called $.ui.autocomplete.escapeRegex:

[...] you can make use of the built-in $.ui.autocomplete.escapeRegex function. It'll take a single string argument and escape all regex characters, making the result safe to pass to new RegExp().

If you are using jQuery UI you can use that function, or copy its definition from the source:

function escapeRegex(value) {
    return value.replace(/[\-\[\]{}()*+?.,\\\^$|#\s]/g, "\\$&");
}

And use it like this:

"[z-a][z-a][z-a]".replace(new RegExp(escapeRegex("[z-a]"), "g"), "[a-z]");
//            escapeRegex("[z-a]")       -> "\[z\-a\]"
// new RegExp(escapeRegex("[z-a]"), "g") -> /\[z\-a\]/g
// end result                            -> "[a-z][a-z][a-z]"
share|improve this answer

And the coffeescript version of Steven Penny's answer, since this is #2 google result....even if coffee isn't really java...;)

baz = "foo"
filter = new RegExp(baz + "d")
"food fight".match(filter)[0] // food

and in my particular case

robot.name=hubot
filter = new RegExp(robot.name)
if msg.match.input.match(filter)
  console.log "True!"
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.