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I'm trying to speed up pagination of data on my site. I'd like to use the following query, but when I do an EXPLAIN it says it needs to scan over 40,000 rows:

SELECT `Item`.`id`, `User`.`id` 
FROM `items` AS `Item` 
LEFT JOIN `users` AS `User` 
    ON (`Item`.`submitter_id` = `User`.`id`) 
WHERE `Item`.`made_popular` < "2010-02-08 22:05:05" 
  AND `Item`.`removed` != 1 
ORDER BY `Item`.`made_popular` DESC 
LIMIT 26

But if I add a lower bound for the "made_popular" field it only needs to scan 99 rows (the number of items between those two dates).

SELECT `Item`.`id`, `User`.`id`
FROM `items` AS `Item` 
LEFT JOIN `users` AS `User` 
    ON (`Item`.`submitter_id` = `User`.`id`) 
WHERE `Item`.`made_popular` < "2010-02-08 22:05:05" 
    AND `Item`.`made_popular` > "2010-02-07 22:05:05" 
    AND `Item`.`removed` != 1 
ORDER BY `Item`.`made_popular` DESC 
LIMIT 26

Both queries use the index I have on the "made_popular" column. In both cases shouldn't it only need to scan 26 rows, assuming there are no "removed" items? I guess the solution could be to go with the second query and add a lower bound that is probably low enough to give me 26 items, but it seems odd that I should have to do a workaround like that.

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LIMIT N,M allows you to set the offset (N) and number of results to return (M). Does LIMIT 1,26 improve performance? –  Girish Rao Feb 9 '11 at 3:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
but when I do an EXPLAIN it says it needs to scan over 40,000 rows:

It is often to misunderstand what rows means. It means approximate amount of rows that could be used to return the result regardless LIMIT clause.

So you shouldn't worry in this case - mysql stops fetching data right after it reaches LIMIT amount.

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Ok, so both these queries should perform exactly the same? Is there any way to find out the number of rows it needs to scan, taking the limit clause into consideration? –  makeee Feb 9 '11 at 3:33
    
@makeee: yes. And make sure you have composite index removed + made_popular. –  zerkms Feb 9 '11 at 3:35
    
@makeee: "Is there any way to find out the number of rows it needs to scan, taking the limit clause into consideration" --- what engine type your tables are? If innodb - then there are some low-level tools that can show how many records actually were fetched from disk. –  zerkms Feb 9 '11 at 3:35
    
@zerkms so an index on made_popular,removed (removed being the second one)? What if less than 1% of rows are "removed"? Is it always worth adding this or is there a tradeoff somewhere, like increased index size? Thanks for the help. –  makeee Feb 9 '11 at 3:42
    
show status like '%innodb%'; -- this is how it can be done for innodb. Look at Innodb_data_reads value. –  zerkms Feb 9 '11 at 3:43

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