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In my current project, am working on a word processing & highlighting solution. Typically every call to the class processing approximately 4000-5000 words long strings.

The structure looks something like this

       public string parseText(string inn)
       {
           //Heavy Parsing    
       }

       public string highlightText(string inn)
       {
                var cleaned =  cleanupText(inn);
                var parsed =  parseText(cleaned );
                //Highlight algorithm
                var formatted=  parseText(parsed);
                return formatted;

       }

       public string cleanupText(string inn)
       {
           //Heavy Parsing    
       }
       public string formatText(string inn)
       {
           //Heavy Parsing    
       }

So i feel passing around the same string around different methods decreases the performance. Even though string is a reference type, it creates a new string and allocates a new memory for each passed variable due to the immutability nature of it. Its different from the other user generated reference types (classes).

To explain more precisely,

if you are passing this type across methods and update a name variable, it will be reflected automatically in caller.

       private void sample(NPX inn) {
            inn.name="changed Name";
       }
       var npx = new NPX() { name = "A", priority = 3 };
       sample(npx);

But, strings are not

       private void sample(string inn) {
            inn = "changed Name";
       }
       var npx = "aaaa";
       sample(npx);

So i consider using ref in all my heavy duty string processing methods. Is it acceptable using ref keyword over reference type. Because code review tools normally spit you when you feed this kind of code.

What are your thoghts.??

share|improve this question
    
Where have you gotten your information? There are a lot of invalid assumptions made in your question. It would serve you well to read up on how parameters are passed in C#. This article from our own Jon Skeet is particularly good: yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/parameters.html –  Cody Gray Feb 9 '11 at 5:34
    
@Cody, thanks for the link.. will check.. –  RameshVel Feb 9 '11 at 5:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Even though string is a reference type, it creates a new string and allocates a new memory for each passed variable due to the immutability nature of it.

This is wrong, is a misunderstanding of what immutability means, and how reference types are passed.

So i consider using ref in all my heavy duty string processing methods.

You start with a false premise, and reach an untenable conclusion.

I'll elaborate on the first point a bit.

Immutability means that you can't mutate an instance of string. So, if someone hands you an instance of string, you can't change it*.

* There are ways, but let's ignore them here.

This does not mean that if you pass an instance of string as a parameter in a method that the instance is copied.

All parameters in C# are passed by value (unless marked with ref or out). For reference types, the value is the reference. Passed by value means that a copy of the value is made, and that copy is passed to the method. For reference types, the value is the reference. In particular, for instances of strings that are parameters to methods, a copy of the reference to the string is passed to the callee.

So, for an instance of string, a copy of the reference is made. If you mutate the value of the reference in the body of the method, the caller doesn't see the change. If you could somehow modify the referent (you can't because strings are immutable), the caller would see the change.

Now, let's consider a simple mutable reference type.

class Foo {
    public int Bar { get; private set; }
    public Foo SetBar(int bar) { this.bar = bar; return this; }
}

and a method

public void Frob(Foo foo, int bar) {
    foo.SetBar(bar);
}

and a simple setup like

var foo = new Foo { Bar = 42 };
Console.WriteLine(foo.Bar);
Frob(foo, 17);
Console.WriteLine(foo.Bar);

This will print

42
17

to the console. Why? Because Frob mutates the referent.

Now let's make a simple immutable object.

class ImmutableFoo {
    private readonly int bar;
    private readonly string name;
    public int Bar { get { return this.bar; } }
    public string Name { get { return this.name; } }
    public Foo(int bar, string name) { this.bar = bar; this.name = name; }
    public Foo SetBar(int bar) { return new Foo(bar, this.name); }
}

and a method

public void Frob(ImmutableFoo immutableFoo, int bar) {
    immutableFoo = immutablefoo.SetBar(bar);
}

and a simple setup like

var foo = new Foo(42, "Fubar");
Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", foo.Bar, foo.Name);
Frob(foo, 17);
Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", foo.Bar, foo.Name);

This will print

42, Fubar
42, Fubar

to the console. Why? Because Frob assigns a new reference to the variable immutableFoo in the body of Frob, but the caller does not see it because the value of the reference foo does not change; it is not modified by the method Frob.

It works the same for string. When you have a method like

private void sample(string inn) {
    inn = "changed Name";
}

what is happening here is that "changed Name" is the referent to a string that is interned on the heap and we are assigning a reference to that string to the variable inn in the method sample. But in

var npx = "aaaa";
sample(npx);

the caller does not see it because npx stills has the same reference value before the call. However, when you say

private void sample(ref string inn) {
    inn = "changed Name";
}

and

var npx = "aaaa";
sample(npx);

now it is the case that inn in sample is an alias for npx in the caller. In this case, the reference is modified, because the two variables are aliases for the same storage location.

share|improve this answer
    
can you please explain a bit?? –  RameshVel Feb 9 '11 at 4:56
    
i got confused because in my 2nd example, string & other references works differently. string does not update the caller but other reference types... –  RameshVel Feb 9 '11 at 5:00
    
@Ramesh Vel: They don't work differently. I maintain my first sentence that you are not correctly understanding immutability, and how reference types are passed. Understand these points, and everything will be clear. The caller's reference is never mutated unless the parameter is passed by ref or out. The referent can be mutated if the referent is not an instance of an immutable type; the caller will see such mutations. So for string, because it is an immutable type, neither the caller's reference (unless the reference is passed by ref or out) nor the referent can be mutated. –  Jason Feb 9 '11 at 5:53
    
i got it clear now... –  RameshVel Feb 9 '11 at 6:13

Strings in .NET (like all objects) are passed "value by reference." In other words, the only value being copied to the stack with each method call is the memory address of the string.

String immutability means once you have created a string object in memory, you can't change the object itself. However, you can easily assign another string variable to it, without changing it:

var s1 = "text";
var s2 = s1; // s2 points to the same object as s1

Passing variables as value by reference means that you can reassign the value of a string variable which is a parameter of the method, without changing the value in the calling method:

void DoSomething(string s)
{
    s = s ?? "Default text";
    // do something that expects s not to be null.
}

In the above example, you could safely call DoSomething, knowing that it will not change the string you pass in. Why? Two reasons:

  1. The string is passed by value, so reassigning the value of the parameter variable itself makes no difference.
  2. Strings are immutable. There is no method on a string object that will result in that object actually being changed once it is created.

So if strings are so immutable, what happens when we do the following?

var s1 = "hello";
var s2 = s1 + " world";

There are actually going to be three strings here. Two ("hello" and "world") will be predefined in the assembly. Because the compiler knows that these objects are immutable, any other "hello" string in the same assembly will point to the same location in memory. (To prove this, try Object.ReferenceEquals("hello", "hello"). The third string will be "built" by a string builder. The above code actually compiles to something like:

const string s1 = "hello";
const string tmp = " world";
var tmpSb = new StringBuilder();
tmpSb.Append(s1);
tmpSb.Append(s2);
var s2 = tmpSb.ToString();

At any point, you could check the value of the tmp variable above, or the s1 variable, and they would still have their original values. The string generated to populate s2 is dynamically created, and occupies a different space than any other string. The variable s2 can be reassigned, but the string object it used to point to is still there, unchanged, until the garbage collector notices that nobody points to it anymore.

So the thing you really want to watch out for when dealing with large strings is to avoid adding them together. The StringBuilder.ToString() call is where you'll see the copies being made. (For example, try Object.ReferenceEquals("hello", new StringBuilder("hello").ToString()). Any time you are adding large groups of strings together, especially in loops, make sure you explicitly declare a StringBuilder right at the start, and append to it, rather than using s += nextWord;

share|improve this answer
    
if thats true why it didnt update the caller on my second example.... private void sample(string inn) { –  RameshVel Feb 9 '11 at 4:59
    
i understand that.. my question is how it behaves when passing string to another methd..... –  RameshVel Feb 9 '11 at 5:02
    
@Ramesh Vel: see my next edit. –  StriplingWarrior Feb 9 '11 at 5:06

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