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What is the need of using two different stacks in same program? How does trap change the current stack of program from user stack to kernel stack? How does it come back to user stack after completing system call?

Does every process have a kernel and user stack?

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What architecture are you studying? –  Gabe Feb 9 '11 at 6:41
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There is one "kernel stack" per CPU. There is one "user stack" for each process, though each thread has its own stack, including both user and kernel threads.

How "trapping changes the stack" is actually fairly simple.

The CPU changes processes or "modes", as a result of an interrupt. The interrupt can occur for many different reasons - a fault occurs, (like an error, or page-fault), or a physical hardware interrupt (like from a device) - or a timer interrupt (which occurs for example when a process has used all of it's allotted CPU time").

Either way - when this interrupt is called, the CPU registers are saved on the stack - all the registers - including the stack pointer itself.

Typically then a "scheduler" would be called. The scheduler then chooses another process to be run - restoring all of its saved registers including the stack pointer, and continues execution from where it left off (stored in the return-address pointer).

This is called a "Context Switch".

I'm simplifying a few things - like how memory management context are saved and restored, but that's the idea. It's just saving and restoring registers in response to an interrupt - including the "stack pointer" register.

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its means windows have one kernel stack per cpu and linux have both user and kernel stack per process. –  user609306 Feb 10 '11 at 5:25
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In Windows each thread (even user-mode threads) has its own kernel stack. Kernel stacks are definitely not per-CPU. –  Gabe Jan 22 at 21:03
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what is the need of using two different stacks in same program

I've never heard of both a kernel and user stack in terms of a single process, though it may be extremely common. It's discussed here.

The kernel stack must be isolated from the user mode stack. Otherwise, user mode code could corrupt the kernel stack, causing a kernel crash.

how does trap changes the current stack of program from user stack to kernel stack

You may want to look for something like the Intel Software Developer's Manuals.

does each process has kernel and user stack

I assume this varies with operating system design, though perhaps it's fairly universal. The links I provided above indicate that Linux uses two (or more) stacks per process. I haven't heard of Windows using a per-process kernel-mode stack.

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its means windows have one kernel stack per cpu and linux have both user and kernel stack per process. –  user609306 Feb 10 '11 at 5:26
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One of the reasons for having a separate kernel stack is that the kernel needs a place to store information where user-mode code can't touch it. That prevents user-mode code running in a different thread/process from accidentally or maliciously affecting execution of the kernel.

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There are 2 stacks because there are 2 CPU execution contexts. The user mode stack will cater to your program with respect to creating stack frames for functions, local variables, return addresses etc. When the CPU switches context to kernel mode, for instance during system call execution, it needs access to kernel memory and data structures and so switches to using it's kernel stack. And yes, Unix I believe uses a per process kernel stack.

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It's operating system dependent. The reason to have it is basic security of the operating system. It's by careful design of the operating system itself. For instance some processors have Kernel, Executive, Supervisor and User stacks.

Renee

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