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What is the functional difference between these three jQuery methods:

  • detach()
  • hide()
  • remove()
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up vote 101 down vote accepted

hide() sets the matched elements' CSS display property to none.

remove() removes the matched elements from the DOM completely.

detach() is like remove(), but keeps the stored data and events associated with the matched elements.

To re-insert a detached element into the DOM, simply insert the returned jQuery set from detach():

var span = $('span').detach();

...

span.appendTo('body');
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7  
Combined with .clone(true), you can use detach for cheap templating that avoids jquery live events: jsfiddle.net/b9chris/PNd2t – Chris Moschini Apr 10 '12 at 19:55
    
I still don't see the difference. If I use remove in stead of detach, the example still works. – comecme Apr 21 '12 at 11:40
8  
@comecme: If you have bound an event like a click handler to the span, call remove(), and attach it again, the binding will be gone and clicking the span will do nothing. If you call detach() and reattach, the binding stays and the click handler keeps working. – jpatokal Jun 7 '12 at 4:41
    
@Kumar's answer is a bit more correct regarding remove() since it isn't removed from the DOM. This has repercussions since complex elements with bound events tend to eat up a lot of browser memory if they're not chewed up by the garbage collector fast enough. A trick to free up memory faster is $(element).html('').remove(); – oskarth Jul 31 '13 at 15:19
    
hide() sets the matched elements' CSS display property to none. It means : Can you describe me the difference between hide() and display:none. – Krish Apr 28 at 7:27

hide() sets the matched element's display to none.

detach() removes the matched elements, including all text and child nodes.

This method stores all the data associated with the element and so can be used to restore the element's data as well as event handlers.

remove() also removes the matched elements, including all text and child nodes.

However, in this case only the element's data can be restored, not its event handlers can't.

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In jQuery, there are three methods for removing elements from the DOM. These three methods are .empty(), .remove(), and .detach(). All these methods are used for removing elements from the DOM, but they all are different.

.hide()

Hide the matched elements. With no parameters, the .hide() method is the simplest way to hide an HTML element:

$(".box").hide();

.empty()

The .empty() method removes all child nodes and content from the selected elements. This method does not remove the element itself, or its attributes.

Note

The .empty() method does not accept any argument to avoid memory leaks. jQuery removes other constructs, such as data and event handlers, from the child elements before removing the elements themselves.

Example

<div class="content">
<div class="hai">Hai</div>
<div class="goodevening">good evening</div>
</div>
<script>
    $("div.hai").empty();
</script>

This will result in a DOM structure with the Hai text deleted:

<div class="content">
<div class="hai"></div>
<div class="goodevening">good evening</div>
</div>

If we had any number of nested elements inside <div class="hai">, they would be removed too.

.remove()

The .remove() method removes the selected elements, including all text and child nodes. This method also removes the data and events of the selected elements.

Note

Use .remove() when you want to remove the element itself, as well as everything inside it. In addition to this, all bound events and jQuery data associated with the elements are removed.

EXAMPLE

Consider the following html:

<div class="content">
<div class="hai">Hai</div>
<div class="goodevening">good evening</div>
</div>
<script>
    $("div.hai").remove();
</script>

This will result in a DOM structure with the <div> element deleted:

<div class="content">
<div class="goodevening">good evening</div>
</div

If we had any number of nested elements inside <div class="hai">, they would be removed too. Other jQuery constructs, such as data or event handlers, are erased as well.

.detach()

The .detach() method removes the selected elements, including all text and child nodes. However, it keeps data and events. This method also keeps a copy of the removed elements, which allows them to be reinserted at a later time.

Note

The .detach() method is useful when removed elements are to be reinserted into the DOM at a later time.

Example

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>

<script src="//code.jquery.com/jquery-1.10.2.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
<p>Hai!</p>Good <p>Afternoo</p>
<button>Attach/detach paragraphs</button>
<script>
$( "p" ).click(function() {
$( this ).toggleClass( "off" );
});
var p;
$( "button" ).click(function() {
if ( p ) {
p.appendTo( "body" );
p = null;
} else {
p = $( "p" ).detach();
}
});
</script>
</body>
</html>

For more info, visit: http://www.scriptcafe.in/2014/03/what-is-difference-between-jquery_15.html

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Imagine a piece of paper on a table with some notes written with pencil.

  • hide -> throw a clothe onto it
  • empty -> remove the notes with an eraser
  • detach -> grab the paper into your hand and keep it there for whatever future plans
  • remove -> grab the paper and throw it to the dustbin

A bit simplified and not completely accurate, but easy to understand.

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<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title>Title</title>
    <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.12.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
    <script>
        $(document).ready(function(){
            var $span;
            $span = $("<span>");
            $span.text("Ngoc Xuan");
            function addEvent() {
                $span.on("click",function(){
                    alert("I'm Span");
                });
            }
            function addSpan() {

                $span.appendTo("body");
            }
           function addButton(name) {
               var $btn = $("<input>");
               $btn.attr({value:name,
                       type:'submit'});
               if(name=="remove"){
                   $btn.on("click",function(){
                       $("body").find("span").remove();
                   })
               }else if(name=="detach"){
                   $btn.on("click",function(){
                       $("body").find("span").detach();
                   })
               }else if(name=="Add") {
                   $btn.on("click",function(){
                       addSpan();
                   })
               }else if(name=="Event"){
                   $btn.on("click",function(){
                       addEvent();
                   })
               }else if (name == "Hide") {
                   $btn.on("click",function(){
                       if($span.text()!= '')
                           $span.hide();
                   })
               }else {
                   $btn.on("click",function(){
                       $span.show();
                   })
               }
               $btn.appendTo("body");
           }
            (function () {
                addButton("remove");
                addButton("detach");
                addButton("Add");
                addButton("Event");
                addButton("Hide");
                addButton("Show");
            })();
        });
    </script>
</body>
</html>
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