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I have a list of lists resulting from a bigsplit() operation (from package biganalytics, part of the bigmemory packages).

Each list represents a column in a matrix, and each list item is an index to a value of 1 in a binary matrix.

What is the best way to turn this list into a sparse binary (0/1) matrix? Is using lapply() within an lapply() the only solution? How do I keep the factors naming the lists as names for the columns?

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If you would give some sample data, if possible in the form of runnable code, that would make life a whole lot easier. So you have list(col1=list(1,4),col2=list(2,6,8), something like that? –  Joris Meys Feb 9 '11 at 8:53
    
I was very slow to respond, but your answers were excellent - thank you! It was exactly what I was looking for. –  Ron Feb 10 '11 at 18:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You might also consider using the Matrix package which deals with large sparse matrices in a more efficient way than base R. You can build a sparse matrix of 0s and 1s by describing which rows and columns should be 1s.

library(Matrix)
Test <- list(
    col1=list(2,4,7),
    col2=list(3,2,6,8),
    col3=list(1,4,5,3,7)
)
n.ids <- sapply(Test,length)
vals <- unlist(Test)
out <- sparseMatrix(vals, rep(seq_along(n.ids), n.ids))

The result is

> out
8 x 3 sparse Matrix of class "ngCMatrix"

[1,] . . |
[2,] | | .
[3,] . | |
[4,] | . |
[5,] . . |
[6,] . | .
[7,] | . |
[8,] . | .
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Exactly what I was looking for. The main trick is using n.ids <- sapply(Test,length)` and then rep(seq_along(n.ids), n.ids) to create the indices into the matrix. Thanks! –  Ron Feb 10 '11 at 18:30
    
rep(seq_along(n.ids), n.ids) is genius. Thank you. –  Zach May 1 '13 at 0:12

You can do this without an lapply whatsoever if you need a matrix.

Say you have a list constructed like this :

Test <- list(
    col1=list(2,4,7),
    col2=list(3,2,6,8),
    col3=list(1,4,5,3,7)
)

First you construct a matrix with zeros of the correct dimensions. If you know them beforehand, that's easy. Otherwise you can derive easily:

n.cols <- length(Test)
n.ids <- sapply(Test,length)
n.rows <- max(unlist(Test))
out <- matrix(0,nrow=n.rows,ncol=n.cols)

Then you use the fact that matrices are filled columnwise to calculate the index of each cell that has to become one :

id <- unlist(Test)+rep(0:(n.cols-1),n.ids)*n.rows
out[id] <- 1
colnames(out) <- names(Test)

This gives :

> out
     col1 col2 col3
[1,]    0    0    1
[2,]    1    1    0
[3,]    0    1    1
[4,]    1    0    1
[5,]    0    0    1
[6,]    0    1    0
[7,]    1    0    1
[8,]    0    1    0
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1  
+1 that's pretty clever. Nice reminder that you can use a 1-d index vector to assign into (or extract from) a matrix. Also filling in a pre-allocated matrix is significantly faster than other approaches that come naturally to mind that involve repeated cbind operations ( e.g. using do.call( cbind, lapply(...)) ). –  Prasad Chalasani Feb 9 '11 at 13:50

Using Joris' example, here's a syntactically simple way using sapply/replace. I suspect Joris' approach is faster, because it fills in a pre-allocated matrix, whereas my approach implicitly involves cbinding a bunch of columns, and so would require repeated memory allocations for the columns (is that true?).

Test <- list( 
col1=list(2,4,7), 
col2=list(3,2,6,8), 
col3=list(1,4,5,3,7) 
) 

> z <- rep(0, max(unlist(Test)))
> sapply( Test, function(x) replace(z,unlist(x),1))
     col1 col2 col3
[1,]    0    0    1
[2,]    1    1    0
[3,]    0    1    1
[4,]    1    0    1
[5,]    0    0    1
[6,]    0    1    0
[7,]    1    0    1
[8,]    0    1    0
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Timings on my computer indicate your's faster if you have a list of vectors. But your code returns an error : Error in x[list] <- values : invalid subscript type 'list'. You have to change c(x) into unlist(x). –  Joris Meys Feb 9 '11 at 22:42
    
@Joris -- actually I did have unlist(x) first, then for some reason I thought it worked when I changed it to c(x)... I think I messed up something in my cut/paste. Now I do get the error with c(x). –  Prasad Chalasani Feb 10 '11 at 1:55

Here is some sample data that seems to fit your description.

a <- as.list(sample(20, 5))
b <- as.list(sample(20, 5))
c <- as.list(sample(20, 5))
abc <- list(a = a, b = b, c = c)

I do not see a way to do this with nested lapply() but here is another way. It would be nice to eliminate the unlist(), but maybe someone else can improve on this.

sp_to_bin <- function(splist) {
  binlist <- numeric(100)
  binlist[unlist(splist)] <- 1
  return(binlist)
}
bindf <- data.frame(lapply(abc, sp_to_bin))
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To build on Joris's answer, which used a scalar index vector to fill in the output matrix, you can also use a matrix index vector to fill in the output matrix; this can sometimes be a little clearer to write or understand later.

Test <- list(
    col1=list(2,4,7),
    col2=list(3,2,6,8),
    col3=list(1,4,5,3,7)
)

n.cols <- length(Test)
n.ids <- sapply(Test,length)
vals <- unlist(Test)
n.rows <- max(vals)
idx <- cbind(vals, rep(seq_along(n.ids), n.ids))
out <- matrix(0,nrow=n.rows,ncol=n.cols)
out[idx] <- 1
colnames(out) <- names(Test)

The result is the same.

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