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I'd like to create an EJB default interceptor that acts on any business method that contains a certain set of parameters, but doesn't need to match exactly. There's the classic method of matching by parameter set, i.e:

<assembly-descriptor>.
<!-- Method interceptor will apply to sendBookingCancellationMessage for EmailSystemBean -->
    <interceptor-binding>
        <ejb-name>MyBean</ejb-name>
        <interceptor-class>SomeInterceptor</interceptor-class>
        <method>
            <method-name>overLoadedMethod</method-name>
            <method-params>
                <method-param>int</method-param>
                <method-param>java.lang.String[][]</method-param>
            </method-params>
        </method>
    </interceptor-binding>
</assembly-descriptor>

But I'd instead like to match on any method that takes an int and a String[][] and whatever else, instead of those exact two. Does anybody know if this can be done?

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2 Answers 2

On Glassfish v3, using the wildcard value '*' for the method name seems to work at the individual bean level:

<interceptor-binding>
   <ejb-name>MyBean</ejb-name>
   <interceptor-class>SomeInterceptor</interceptor-class>
   <method>
      <method-name>*</method-name>
      <method-params>
         <method-param>int</method-param>
         <method-param>java.lang.String[][]</method-param>
      </method-params>
   </method>
</interceptor-binding>

However, this behavior isn't called out in the Interceptors specification so far as I can see, so it probably shouldn't be relied upon.

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The thought was nice, but not what I was looking for. I'm not trying to match any method, but any method that takes, but is not limited to, an int and a String[][]. –  mikek Feb 10 '11 at 7:56

It couldn't be done in a standard-defined way.

However, you can simply intercept every call and check for the parameter types yourself.

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