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c#

public sealed class RC5
    {
        private readonly uint[] _bufKey = new uint[4];
        private readonly uint[] _bufSub = new uint[26];
};

c++(errors)

class RC5
{
protected:
        unsigned __int32[] _bufKey = new unsigned __int32[4];
        unsigned __int32[] _bufSub = new unsigned __int32[26];
};

Of course I got errors in the c++ code , I don't know how make it right can someone help me please?! Thanks

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Can you include the errors you're getting? –  Tragedian Feb 9 '11 at 9:36
    
@Programming Hero unsigned __int32 _bufKey[] = new unsigned __int32[4]; Error :1 IntelliSense: data member initializer is not allowed –  MixedCoder Feb 9 '11 at 9:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. In C++ the array "marker" must follow the variable name, not the type name.
  2. You have two ways in C++ to instantiate the array:

a) Make it a fix array:

class RC5 {
  protected:
    unsigned __int32 _bufKey[4];
    unsigned __int32 _bufSub[26];
};

b) Allocate it on the heap:

class RC5 {
  public:
    RC5() :
      _bufKey(new unsigned __int32[4]),
      _bufSub(new unsigned __int32[26]) {
    }
    virtual ~RC5() {
      delete [] _bufKey;
      delete [] _bufSub;
    }
  protected:
    unsigned __int32 *const _bufKey;
    unsigned __int32 *const _bufSub;
};
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2  
If you’re advocating raw pointers, could you at least mention that there are better C++ ways? Furthermore, your destructor strictly speaking needn’t be virtual since the C# class is sealed and so doesn’t require inheritance. Apart from that yours is a good answer and since mine seems to be downvoted let’s make yours, which is the highest voted, the best. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 9 '11 at 10:04

All previous answers are wrong – and not just slightly, but completely.

[] in C# is std::vector<> in C++ and private is private, not protected.

Furthermore, you need to initialize the variables in the constructor, and new isn’t used.

class RC5 {
private:

    std::vector<unsigned> _bufKey;
    std::vector<unsigned> _bufSub;

public:

    RC5() : _bufKey(4), _bufSub(16) { }
};

This requires the standard header <vector> to work.

If the size of the fields is static then using std::array<> (or, if you insist, a static C array) is also an option (this requires a modern C++ compiler):

class RC5 {
private:

    std::array<unsigned, 4> _bufKey;
    std::array<unsigned, 16> _bufSub;
};

That said, get a C++ book. Neither Stack Overflow nor such examples can teach you basic C++ syntax.

share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter: care to explain? –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 9 '11 at 10:00
1  
@Konrad Rudolph i know private is private but in c# it's sealed thats why i made it protected –  MixedCoder Feb 9 '11 at 10:02
1  
@MixedCoder But protected and sealed mean completely different things and making it protected here makes no sense, especially if it isn’t meant for inheritance (that’s what sealed means). –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 9 '11 at 10:02
3  
@MixedCoder: I think you are going to have a really hard time coding C++ if you assume that it is anything like C#. In this question alone we have seen several important differences. Listen to this guy; get a good book. –  Magnus Hoff Feb 9 '11 at 10:11
1  
@MixedCoder: tinyurl.com/so-cxxbooks –  Fred Nurk Feb 9 '11 at 10:20

You can't initialize members in C++ directly in class definition, you must set them inside a method (usually constructor).

This is because class definition can be loaded several times in different files (classes are usually defined in header, headers are usually included in other headers or CPP files), which would lead to multiple execution of one piece of code.

This is solution:

class RC5
{
protected:
    unsigned* _bufKey;
    unsigned* _bufSub;
public:
    RC5(){
        this->_bufKey = new unsigned[4];
        this->_bufSub = new unsigned[26];
    }
};

OR this

class RC5
{
protected:
    unsigned _bufKey[4];
    unsigned _bufSub[26];
};

Of course good practice is to separate method body from class definition, but that is easy to do.

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Errors: IntelliSense: expected an identifier,IntelliSense: expected a ';',IntelliSense: expected a ';',IntelliSense: class "RC5" has no member "_bufSub",IntelliSense: class "RC5" has no member "_bufKey" –  MixedCoder Feb 9 '11 at 9:52
    
After the change this should at least compile but it’s bad C++ for a number of different reasons and it’s not a direct translation. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 9 '11 at 9:57
    
Edited and fixed –  Matěj Zábský Feb 9 '11 at 9:57

The error indicates the real problem:

data member initializer is not allowed

You cannot declare a member of a class in C++ and initialize it in the same line. Instead you will have to declare the members and initialize them separately (in a constructor):

class RC5
{
protected:
        unsigned __int32[] _bufKey;
        unsigned __int32[] _bufSub;

public:
        RC5();
};

RC5::RC5()
{
    this._bufKey = new unsigned __int32[4];
    this._bufSub = new unsigned __int32[26];
}

(My C++ syntax is rusty, so apologies for any syntax errors.)

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Errors:IntelliSense: expression must have class type,IntelliSense: expected an identifier,IntelliSense: expected a ';',IntelliSense: expected a ';' –  MixedCoder Feb 9 '11 at 9:54

The C++ type is, unsigned int.

Also note that, you can't initialize C++ arrays this way using new. You have to use Pointers and assign memory to that.

share|improve this answer
    
You can use unsigned on its own as well. somacon.com/p111.php –  Matěj Zábský Feb 9 '11 at 9:26
    
unsigned __int32 _bufKey[] = new unsigned __int32[4]; Error :1 IntelliSense: data member initializer is not allowed –  MixedCoder Feb 9 '11 at 9:29
    
My initial post implied that "__int32" is not a type in C++. I guess the PO was discussing about how to initialize. In that case, the method described by mzabsky should be followed. –  Shamim Hafiz Feb 9 '11 at 9:47

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