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I understand why GUI controls have thread affinity.

But why don't the controls use the invoke internally in their methods and properties?

Now you have to do stuff like this just to update TextBox value:

this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate()
{
    textBox.Text = "newValue";
}

While using just textBox.Text = "newValue"; would be enough to represent the same logic.

All that would have to be done is change textBox.Text logic from this (pseudocode):

public string Text
{
    set
    {
        if(!this.InvokeRequired)
            // do the change logic
        else
            throw new BadThreadException();
    }
}

To this:

public string Text
{
    set
    {
        if(!this.InvokeRequired)
            // do the change logic
        else
            this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate()
            {
                // do the change logic
            }
    }
}

The same goes for getters and methods.

I'm certainly not proposing to remove Invoke/BeginInvoke, I'm just asking why the controls don't do the necessary thread switch themselves instead of throwing exception.

share|improve this question
    
Because you generally shouldn't have a need to update controls on a different thread than they were created on. Doing so is an exceptional case, so you have to jump through hoops. There would be nearly no benefit to having this built-in. – Cody Gray Feb 9 '11 at 12:00
    
I suppose any single "Invoke" implies more overhead, and if you have a lot of controls that do automatic invoke you can incur in performance issues. By throwing the excpetion, the system force developers to concern with threading issues, and use the Dispatcher to do a single Invoke call with all assignements within. – BertuPG Feb 9 '11 at 12:04
up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think this way API enforces developers to make explicit decision and avoid unintentional programming mistakes. Here are several problems that I could come up with right away:

1. Unintentional thread blocking. If you write to a property, calling thread will have to block until message is processed by UI thread. And if calling thread owns a resource that UI thread might want to acquire you'll get a deadlock which is hard to debug (Calling thread holds a resource, and wait until message is processed by UI thread; UI thread waits until the resource is released).

2. Unexpected surprises. If we would make write operations implicitly asynchronous we run into a situation where reader should never expect values to be always up to date.

3. Performance impact. If you write an intensive algorithm which uses UI dispatching implicitly, you end up with really poor performance and you are free to blame framework developers. After all you wrote sorting that should run in O(n), but for some reason it takes ages to complete.

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1  
I was thinking these might be the reasons too, but there are so many gotchas to the threads already, so I don't think this would make much difference. – Matěj Zábský Feb 9 '11 at 12:21

Well, unless any of the desginers or implementers from the framework answers, this can only be speculated upon, but the most obvious though that springs to (at least my) mind is complexity. Adding the thread switching logic in all relevant places of all controls would lead to a huge increase in their complexity (just imagine all testing needed to verify the behavior everywhere). It would probably simply not be worth the effort, so that work is transferred to the users of the controls (us, that), that need to take this little extra tour in the cases where it is needed.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess it would be to mark the methods and properties with an attribute and then add the thread switch at compile time (or after - similar to what NotifyPropertyWeaver does) – Matěj Zábský Feb 9 '11 at 12:25
    
@mzabsky: good point. That would be easier but would move the complexity into the compiler instead, which would still be a quite expensive change. – Fredrik Mörk Feb 9 '11 at 13:13

Agree with @Code Gray, Windows shall thrown a Cross Thread calls exception if a different thread updates a control . However you can make thread safe calls - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms171728(v=VS.100).aspx

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