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I'm still unsure if it's me don't understanding or the documentation isn't clearly formulated. The following excerpt has been taken from the newest draft (N3126, section 29.6):

bool atomic_compare_exchange_weak(volatile A* object, C * expected, C desired);
bool atomic_compare_exchange_weak(A* object, C * expected, C desired);
bool atomic_compare_exchange_strong(volatile A* object, C * expected, C desired);
bool atomic_compare_exchange_strong(A* object, C * expected, C desired);
bool atomic_compare_exchange_weak_explicit(volatile A* object, C * expected, C desired, memory_order success, memory_order failure);
bool atomic_compare_exchange_weak_explicit(A* object, C * expected, C desired, memory_order success, memory_order failure);
bool atomic_compare_exchange_strong_explicit(volatile A* object, C * expected, C desired, memory_order success, memory_order failure);
bool atomic_compare_exchange_strong_explicit(A* object, C * expected, C desired, memory_order success, memory_order failure);
bool A::compare_exchange_weak(C & expected, C desired, memory_order success, memory_order failure) volatile;
bool A::compare_exchange_weak(C & expected, C desired, memory_order success, memory_order failure);
bool A::compare_exchange_strong(C & expected, C desired, memory_order success, memory_order failure) volatile;
bool A::compare_exchange_strong(C & expected, C desired, memory_order success, memory_order failure);
bool A::compare_exchange_weak(C & expected, C desired, memory_order order = memory_order_seq_cst) volatile;
bool A::compare_exchange_weak(C & expected, C desired, memory_order order = memory_order_seq_cst);
bool A::compare_exchange_strong(C & expected, C desired, memory_order order = memory_order_seq_cst) volatile;
bool A::compare_exchange_strong(C & expected, C desired, memory_order order = memory_order_seq_cst);

Remark: The weak compare-and-exchange operations may fail spuriously, that is, return false while leaving the contents of memory pointed to by expected before the operation is the same that same as that of the object and the same as that of expected after the operation. [ Note: This spurious failure enables implementation of compare-and-exchange on a broader class of machines, e.g., loadlocked store-conditional machines. A consequence of spurious failure is that nearly all uses of weak compare-and-exchange will be in a loop.

So, what does this mean? Firstly, it 'may' faild spuriously?! Why it does? And how do they define 'may'? Secondly, I don't know why, but I still have no idea what's the difference between the functions with "_strong" and "_weak" suffix.

Hope anybody can help ;) Best regards.

EDIT: That's what I've found in libstdc++-implementation (atomic_0.h):

bool compare_exchange_weak(
    __integral_type& __i1,
    __integral_type __i2,
    memory_order __m1,
    memory_order __m2
)
{
    __glibcxx_assert(__m2 != memory_order_release);
    __glibcxx_assert(__m2 != memory_order_acq_rel);
    __glibcxx_assert(__m2 <= __m1);
    return _ATOMIC_CMPEXCHNG_(this, &__i1, __i2, __m1);
}

bool compare_exchange_strong(
    __integral_type& __i1,
    __integral_type __i2,
    memory_order __m1,
    memory_order __m2
)
{
    __glibcxx_assert(__m2 != memory_order_release);
    __glibcxx_assert(__m2 != memory_order_acq_rel);
    __glibcxx_assert(__m2 <= __m1);
    return _ATOMIC_CMPEXCHNG_(this, &__i1, __i2, __m1);
}
share|improve this question
    
I added the STL tag, with hope it'll bring Howard Hinnant there, he's been working on implementing these in libc++ so he should know about it. –  Matthieu M. Feb 9 '11 at 12:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It has to do with the shared memory consistency model that the hardware implements. For those hardware architectures that implement some kind of relaxed consistency model (e.g. release semantics), the strong operations you refer to above can have a high overhead, and thus experts can use the weaker forms to implement algorithms that perform well also on those relaxed consistency architectures.

For more info, see e.g.

http://www.hpl.hp.com/techreports/Compaq-DEC/WRL-95-7.pdf

Chapter 12 and Appendix C in http://kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/paulmck/perfbook/perfbook.html

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1  
But, isn't it the sense of memory_order parameter to strengthen or weaken the memory-ordering model? –  0xbadf00d Feb 9 '11 at 14:34
    
No, that is specified by the hardware. That parameter specifies the minimum ordering your algorithm requires in order to operate correctly. It is then up the C++0x implementation to make sure that at least the specified ordering is provided; for strongly ordered architectures like x86, it's likely that both the strong and weak implementations are the same. –  janneb Feb 9 '11 at 15:56
    
Sry, but it still doesn't make sense to me. Isn't it redundant to specify the ordering via memory_order parameter and strong or weak methods? Maybe it would help to know what's the main (abstract) difference between weak and strong compare_exchange. –  0xbadf00d Feb 9 '11 at 16:42
3  
@FrEEzE: The difference is exactly what the standard says - that the weak version is allowed to fail occasionally, if that makes it run faster on your hardware. Not applicable for x86. –  Bo Persson Feb 9 '11 at 21:44
    
+1, Thanks for your answer. –  0xbadf00d Feb 10 '11 at 4:08

The note gives a clue, referring to LL/SC architectures. From the Wikipedia article:

If any updates have occurred, the store-conditional is guaranteed to fail, even if the value read by the load-link has since been restored. As such, an LL/SC pair is stronger than a read followed by a compare-and-swap (CAS), which will not detect updates if the old value has been restored (see ABA problem).

Real implementations of LL/SC do not always succeed if there are no concurrent updates to the memory location in question. Any exceptional events between the two operations, such as a context switch, another load-link, or even (on many platforms) another load or store operation, will cause the store-conditional to spuriously fail.

On LL/SC chips the compare_exchange will be implemented in terms of LL/SC, which can spuriously fail, so compare_exchange_strong needs extra overhead to retry in the case of failure. Providing both compare_exchange_strong and compare_exchange_weak allows the programmer to decide whether they want the library to handle spurious failures (in which case they'd use compare_exchange_strong or if they want to handle it in their own code (in which case they'd use compare_exchange_weak)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer. One thing to discuss is about "retry in the case of failure", should it be "retry in the case of spurious failure"? If that's a true failure due to contention (dest value not equal to the expected), compare_exchange_strong should return false immediately w/o any retry. Do you agree? –  Eric Z Aug 8 at 8:35
    
I posted a question regarding compare_exchange_weak here. Would you mind taking a look and sharing some knowledge you know with us? Thanks. –  Eric Z Aug 8 at 9:12
    
Yes, the strong form retries in case of spurious failure, not when the object doesn't have the expected value. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 8 at 9:27

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