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I have a stored procedure that runs to update gaming points for user balances. It's an insert with 5 subqueries. I have isolated one of the subqueries as the query that slows the entire batch down. Without it, the stored procedure will run in under 2 seconds. With it, it will take as much as 8 seconds. 8 Seconds isn't the end of the world, but for the sake of scalability, I will need to have it complete faster. Here is the isolated subquery:

(SELECT IsNull(Sum(A.TransAmount) + Sum(Case When A.BetResult = 1 Then (A.BetWinAmount + (A.TransAmount * -1)) End), 0)
            FROM User_T A
            LEFT OUTER JOIN User_TD B on A.TID = B.TID
            LEFT OUTER JOIN Lines_BL C ON B.LID = C.LID
            LEFT OUTER JOIN Lines_BM D ON C.BMID = D.BMID
            LEFT OUTER JOIN Event_M E ON D.EID = E.EID
            LEFT OUTER JOIN Event_KB F ON A.TransReason = F.BID
            LEFT OUTER JOIN Event_M G ON F.BID = G.EID
        where A.UserID = U.UserID AND (A.IsSettled = 1)
        AND 
        (
        (A.TransReason = 1 AND (datediff(dd, Convert(datetime, E.EDate, 101), Convert(datetime, @EndDate, 101)) = @DaysAgo)) OR 
        (A.TransReason >= 3000 AND (datediff(dd, Convert(datetime, G.EDate, 101), Convert(datetime, @EndDate, 101)) = @DaysAgo)
                AND  [dbo].[Event_CEAFKBID](A.TransReason) = 1) OR
        (A.TransReason BETWEEN 3 and 150 AND (datediff(dd, Convert(datetime, A.TransDT, 101), Convert(datetime, @EndDate, 101)) = @DaysAgo))
        )

What I have done to further isolate: When I run a Select * on just the joins (without the where clauses), the performance in very good - > 100000 rows in under a second. As I add in the where clauses, I believe the great slow down is from the 'or' clause and/or the function that needs to be evaluated.

As I understand it, a function inside the where clause evaluates each row - as opposed to somehow caching the definition of the function and evaluating that way. I do have indexes on the tables, but I am wondering if some of them are not correct.

Without you knowing the full database structure, I am sure it's very difficult to pin down where the problem is, but I would like to get pointed in a direction to begin to further isolate.

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3  
Have you looked at the execution plan for the query? That will often help point you in the right direction. Especially in cases where indicies may not be used where expected or what joins are the most costly etc. –  Chris Baxter Feb 9 '11 at 14:54
    
Yes that's a function...and what's sanitize? –  IMAbev Feb 9 '11 at 15:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suspect your biggest performance hits are from the correlated subquery (whatever table is behind U.UserId) and from the embedded function call dbo.Event_CEAFKBID. Much of course depends upon how big the tables are (how many rows are being read). All those datetime conversions won’t help and generate a very strong “bad design” smell, but I don’t think they’d impact performance too much.

Those left outer joins are ugly, as the optimizer has to check them all for row – so if “A” is big, all the joins on all the rows have to be performed, even if there’s no data there. If they can be replaced with inner joins, do so, but I’m guessing not because of that “table E or table G” logic. Lesses, it sure looks like what you’ve got is three separate queries moshed into one; if you broke it out into three, unioned together, it’d look something like the Frankenstein query below. I’ve no idea if this would run faster or not (heck, I can’t even debug the query and make sure the panetheses balance), but if you’ve got sparse data relative to your logic this should run pretty fast. (I took out the date conversions to make the code more legible, you’d have to plug them back in.)

SELECT isnull(sum(Total), 0) FinalTotal from (
SELECT 
   sum(A.TransAmount + Case When A.BetResult = 1 Then A.BetWinAmount - A.TransAmount else 0 End) Total
 FROM User_T A            
 INNER JOIN User_TD B on A.TID = B.TID             
INNER JOIN Lines_BL C ON B.LID = C.LID             
INNER JOIN Lines_BM D ON C.BMID = D.BMID             
INNER JOIN Event_M E ON D.EID = E.EID             
 where A.UserID = U.UserID
  AND A.IsSettled = 1
  AND A.TransReason = 1 
  AND (datediff(dd, E.EDate, @EndDate) = @DaysAgo)) 

UNION ALL SELECT 
   sum(A.TransAmount + Case When A.BetResult = 1 Then A.BetWinAmount - A.TransAmount else 0 End) Total
 FROM User_T A            
INNER JOIN Event_KB F ON A.TransReason = F.BID             
INNER JOIN Event_M G ON F.BID = G.EID        
 where A.UserID = U.UserID
  AND A.IsSettled = 1
  AND A.TransReason >= 3000 
  AND (datediff(dd, G.EDate, @EndDate) = @DaysAgo)                 
  AND [dbo].[Event_CEAFKBID](A.TransReason) = 1

UNION ALL SELECT 
   sum(A.TransAmount + Case When A.BetResult = 1 Then A.BetWinAmount - A.TransAmount else 0 End) Total
 FROM User_T A            
 where A.UserID = U.UserID
  AND A.IsSettled = 1
  AND A.TransReason BETWEEN 3 and 150 
  AND datediff(dd, A.TransDT, @EndDate) = @DaysAgo)
) ThreeWayUnion
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That was amazing, Philip! Lots of food for thought. I am going to try to run this and see what happens. –  IMAbev Feb 9 '11 at 16:06
    
Do lots of testing. Note the critical difference between UNION and UNION ALL, and since you would now be running three correlated subqueries instead of one, it might be slower... –  Philip Kelley Feb 9 '11 at 16:33
    
Phil (or anyone) I am re-reading and wondering about the alternative to the datetime conversions. If I am writing rows when they happen down to the second, how else would I determine when rows fall on a certain date? –  IMAbev Feb 9 '11 at 19:02
    
That's a tricky and involved question to answer, and totally depends on what you need to do with the data you store. (Calendar date? 24 hours from the last one? and so on.) Check out and get familiar with all the datetime functions (datepart, datediff, etc). Of course what you probably really want is dateadd(dd, datediff(dd, 0, @datetime), 0), the answer to a lot of SO questions, not that I can find any quickly just now. Try it out; alas, how it does what it does is beyond the scope of a Comment box. –  Philip Kelley Feb 9 '11 at 20:43

You can put the case in the where cause, and not directly on select first line. why you need to put many join if in this statment you just user the tables A,E and G?

To performance better queries you can use execution plan on management Studio.

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The only way to get to tables A,E and G is to go through the other tables in the join. I have used the execution plan but deciphering it is going to be a different question. –  IMAbev Feb 9 '11 at 15:17

Correlated subqueries are a very poor programming technique which equates to using a cursor in the query. Make it a derived table instead.

And yes those functions are slowing you down. If you have to convert to datetime, your database structure needs to be fixed and the data stored correctly as datetime.

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Great info, thanks! I will look in to the derived tables and I am sure I have many other stored procs that can be cleaned up as well. –  IMAbev Feb 9 '11 at 15:09
    
You could also use CTEs instead of derived tables. –  HLGEM Feb 9 '11 at 15:27

Do you need to do the conversions on the datetime for the DATEDIFF functions? Are you storing the dates as test, or are you reconverting to get rid of the time? If you are, then you don't need to as days different will be correct including time.

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Great question - really got me thinking...I was reconverting to get rid of time. Because of the different events that happen (the rows inserted), they have an actual time stamp, but I actually want the activity for that entire day. I think I need to still reconvert, though. –  IMAbev Feb 9 '11 at 15:13
    
As I stated above, I removed the date conversions and only saw very small performance gains. My conversions were, upon further review, redundant because the data being converter was already a datetime datatype. Perhaps that is why there was no negligible performance gain? –  IMAbev Feb 25 '11 at 21:08

You should review whether the outer joins are necessary - they are more expensive than inner joins. You have some values that come from the dominant table, tagged A. You also have an OR condition that references E, and an OR condition that references G. I'd look to restructure the query along the lines of:

SELECT SUM(x.result)
  FROM (SELECT A.TransAmount + CASE WHEN A.BetResult = 1
                               THEN (A.BetWinAmount + (A.TransAmount * -1))
                               ELSE 0 END AS result
          FROM A
         WHERE A.TransReason BETWEEN 3 AND 150
           AND datediff(dd, Convert(datetime, A.TransDT, 101),
                            Convert(datetime, @EndDate,  101)) = @DaysAgo
           AND A.UserID = U.UserID    -- Where does alias U come from?
           AND A.IsSettled = 1
        UNION
        SELECT A.TransAmount + CASE WHEN A.BetResult = 1
                               THEN (A.BetWinAmount + (A.TransAmount * -1))
                               ELSE 0 END AS result
          FROM User_T   A
          JOIN User_TD  B ON A.TID  = B.TID
          JOIN Lines_BL C ON B.LID  = C.LID
          JOIN Lines_BM D ON C.BMID = D.BMID
          JOIN Event_M  E ON D.EID  = E.EID
         WHERE A.TransReason = 1
           AND datediff(dd, Convert(datetime, E.EDate,  101),
                            Convert(datetime, @EndDate, 101)) = @DaysAgo
           AND A.UserID = U.UserID    -- Where does alias U come from?
           AND A.IsSettled = 1
        UNION
        SELECT A.TransAmount + CASE WHEN A.BetResult = 1
                               THEN (A.BetWinAmount + (A.TransAmount * -1))
                               ELSE 0 END S result
          FROM User_T   A
          JOIN User_TD  B ON A.TID  = B.TID
          JOIN Lines_BL C ON B.LID  = C.LID
          JOIN Lines_BM D ON C.BMID = D.BMID
          JOIN Event_M  E ON D.EID  = E.EID
          JOIN Event_KB F ON A.TransReason = F.BID
          JOIN Event_M  G ON F.BID  = G.EID
         WHERE A.TransReason >= 3000
           AND datediff(dd, Convert(datetime, G.EDate, 101),
                            Convert(datetime, @EndDate, 101)) = @DaysAgo
           AND [dbo].[Event_CEAFKBID](A.TransReason) = 1
           AND A.UserID = U.UserID    -- Where does alias U come from?
           AND A.IsSettled = 1
       ) AS x

The thinking here is that the inner join queries will each be quicker than the outer join queries, and summing intermediate results is not a hardship to the DBMS (it was doing that anyway). It probably also avoids the need for IFNULL.

The alias U is, presumably, a reference to the outer query of which this is a part.

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Hi Jonathan. Great stuff there! The U table is the users table. With your response and Philip's response, it looks like I really need to get my head around a Union query. –  IMAbev Feb 9 '11 at 16:09
    
Jonathan - I finally had time to sit down and understand this. With the help of your example, I was able to rewrite this section of the subquery. I ran both the old and new scripts through profiler and I went from >21,000 reads and 250ms to 1318 reads and 62ms! Hopefully when I throw all of this together I see enormous performance gains! FYI Some suggested to remove the date conversions. I tested both with and without and without only provided about a 5ms gain. –  IMAbev Feb 25 '11 at 21:06

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