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I have the following function to convert an integer of arbitrary size to a buffer:

template<typename T>
std::string build_data_from(T val)
{
  std::string result;

  for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(val); i++)
  {
    result.insert(0, 1, char(val));
    val = val >> 8;
  }

  return result;
};

However, invoking the template function with an unsigned char renders a warning in Visual C++ 2008:

std::string x(build_data_from<unsigned char>(1));

warning C4333: '>>' : right shift by too large amount, data loss

Is there any clean way (without using a pragma warning directive) to workaround it?

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1  
you could specialize the template function for the unsigned char case. This is however just a workaround that requires double coding –  king_nak Feb 9 '11 at 16:05
    
You could also extract and specialize only the bitshift function. –  UncleBens Feb 9 '11 at 16:07
    
@king_nak: not really double coding, there is no loop / bit-shifting required for char and unsigned char so the methods are much easier. –  Matthieu M. Feb 9 '11 at 16:18
    
@UncleBens: but what's the point of looping and shifting for a 8-bits type ;) ? –  Matthieu M. Feb 9 '11 at 16:21
1  
The #pragma is obvious. If that's verboten then I'd just test on sizeof(val) == 1. The code generator gets rid of it anyway. –  Hans Passant Feb 9 '11 at 16:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Pretty simple: overloading build_data_from for unsigned char (and char).

This can be done either by a plain overload or using std::enable_if, I'd advise a plain overload as it'll be easier:

std::string build_data_from(char val)
{
  std::string result; result += val; return result;
}

std::string build_data_from(unsigned char val)
{
  return build_data_from(char(val));
}

But, you are conscious that casting an unsigned char to a char might produce some weird output right ? (I mean that unsigned char might have values that are not really printable)

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The following will get rid of he warning.

change

val = val >> 8;

to

val = val >> 7 >> 1;

or

val = (val >> 7 >> 1) & 0xff;
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Don't know why the other solutions had more upvotes... this seems like the cleanest/simplest solution... works for me! –  James Johnston Jun 13 at 18:17

You can get around this with a single if-statement:

template<typename T>
std::string build_data_from(T val)
{
  std::string result;

  for (size_t i = 0; i < sizeof(val); i++)
  {
    result.insert(0, 1, char(val));
    if (sizeof (T) > 1)
      val = val >> 8;
  }

  return result;
}

Since the conditional if (sizeof(T) > 1) is constant for any T the compiler will optimize it away, so no runtime overhead and no warnings. For the case that T is a char you even get slightly faster code because the shift gets optimized away.

Btw: You should declare your i variable as size_t, not int. the result of sizeof() is size_t and some compilers (gcc for example) warn you if you do a comparison between signed and unsigned integers.

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I think you meant sizeof(T) > 1 since sizeof gives the number of char, not the number of bits. Also, the loop is spurious for char and unsigned char, and there is no need to call insert at all since the data can be appended... much easier to overload :) –  Matthieu M. Feb 9 '11 at 16:20
    
of course.. stupid me.. I'll edit the answer –  Nils Pipenbrinck Feb 9 '11 at 16:49
    
Your proposal still renders a warning. I've accepted Matthieu's solution. –  Romulo Ceccon Feb 9 '11 at 16:51
    
I've changed the i variable declaration, though. Thanks. –  Romulo Ceccon Feb 9 '11 at 16:56

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