Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I mean in this code:

List<Integer> list = new LinkedList();
list.add(1);
list.add(2);
list.add(3);

for (Integer i : list)
    i++;

System.out.println(list.get(0))

returns 1 not 2. In for-each loop Java creates new object (i) and copies fields value from object in List?

share|improve this question
    
the question makes a good joke :) –  bestsss Feb 9 '11 at 16:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Integers are immutable.

Your code changes the i variable to point to a brand-new Integer instance with a larger value.

The original Integer instance in the list is not (and cannot be) changed.

share|improve this answer
    
I forgot that Integer objects are immutable. what a pity –  rll Feb 9 '11 at 16:40
1  
@rll: It's actually a very, very, very good thing that Integer objects are immutable! –  ColinD Feb 9 '11 at 16:42
    
just a nitpick, instance with a larger value, could a lesser one as well :) –  bestsss Feb 9 '11 at 16:47
1  
@rll: Otherwise, arbitrary Integer objects could change behind your back. –  SLaks Feb 9 '11 at 16:52
1  
@rll: For one thing, it's consistent with int primitives... if you pass an int to some method, it can't change the value of the int that you're using without you knowing. The same is true for Integer objects. Think of it like this... the value "1" should always be the value "1". "1" can't just become "3". If you want "3", you need to get the value "3"... which is a different and distinct object. It's logical for an object representing such a value to be unable to change, in addition to the practical advantages of not having to worry about code elsewhere changing values under your feet. –  ColinD Feb 9 '11 at 16:58

the ++ operator is not a valid operator on the Integer object, so Java uses it's auto-boxing features to convert the Integer object into an int primitive. Once it's converted, the int primitive is incremented. You don't save the primitive so it is lost.

To achieve the goal you need to do something like

List<Integer> list = new LinkedList();
list.add(1);
list.add(2);
list.add(3);


for (int index; index < list.size(); index++) {
   int value = list.get(index).intValue();
   value++;
   list.set(index, Integer.valueOf(value));
}

System.out.println(list.get(0))

The code above is not optimal; but it doesn't use autoboxing. An optimized solution would use a ListIterator (added by popular demand) :^)

ListIterator<Integer> iterator = list.iterator();
while (iterator.hasNext()) {
  iterator.set(iterator.get()++);
}

Note that this loop uses autoboxing heavily, if you wish to get an idea of what autoboxing is doing under the covers, the equivalent solution presented below doesn't rely on any autoboxing.

ListIterator<Integer> iterator = list.iterator();
while (iterator.hasNext()) {
  iterator.set(Integer.valueOf(iterator.get().intValue()++));
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 also, Integer is immutable, why the autoboxing –  Yanick Rochon Feb 9 '11 at 16:12
2  
++ is a valid operator on Integer and it modifies the variable to reference a Integer that is one higher than the previous one. The real reason this doesn't work is that Integer is immutable and ++ only creates a new version. –  Joachim Sauer Feb 9 '11 at 16:15
    
No, the "Object i" which has a Type of Integer never gets incremented. If it did, then there would be a method called on "Object i" and "++" is not a method. "Object i" gets converted into "primitive i" due to auto-boxing, and "primitive i" gets incremented. This leaves "Object i" untouched. –  Edwin Buck Feb 9 '11 at 16:16
    
@Edwin: You should try it. i++ on an object Integer i assigns i to an Integer object with a value 1 greater than the original value of i. If you mean that the original object itself isn't modified, that is of course true since it's immutable. –  ColinD Feb 9 '11 at 16:20
    
@ColinD, It isn't that it won't compile, or that it won't return a value one greater, it's that you're misattributing the operation ++ to the Integer. Autoboxing converts the Integer to an int first because there's no "public int "++"() { ... }" method in Integer. –  Edwin Buck Feb 9 '11 at 16:28

It does allow it, it doesn't do what you think it does.

What you have is shorthand for.

for (Iterator<Integer> iter = list.iterator(); iter.hashNext();) {
    Integer i = iter.next();
    i++; // value is discarded after this line.
}

EDIT: rather than using get(i) and set(i, value) which can be very expensive for LinkedList, a better choice would be to use ListIterator.

for (ListIterator<Integer> iter = list.listIterator(); iter.hasNext();)
    iter.set(iter.next()+1);
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 Using the iterator is really the best solution here. –  ColinD Feb 9 '11 at 16:30
    
Otherwise the LinkedList has to tranverse the list from the start every time to find & set the n-th element. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 9 '11 at 16:32
1  
Nice optimization. I like the list iterator. –  Edwin Buck Feb 9 '11 at 16:36
    
that's the correct use of ListIteator –  bestsss Feb 9 '11 at 16:37
    
The fastest way to do this is using TIntArrayList.increment(n) or int[] with ++ as they use primitive values. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 9 '11 at 17:14

Because the 0th element in the list is the "1", which you added in line 2.

Oh, I understand: You want to increment the integers. You have to do:

for( int i=0; i<list.size(); i++ ) {
    list.set(i,list.get(i)+1);
}

Please note that Integer instances are immutable. The value cannot change!

share|improve this answer
1  
should use list iterator now it's O(n*n) –  bestsss Feb 9 '11 at 16:35
    
You are right. I didn't note the LinkedList, thought it was an ArrayList. –  Daniel Feb 9 '11 at 16:40

Because Integer is immutable, just like String, etc.

The operator ++ on an integer is just like doing :

i = new Integer(i.intValue()+1);`

You'll need to list.set(index, i); to modify the value in your list.

for (int index=0; index<list.size(); index++) {
   list.set(index, list.get(index)+1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
And you should not call set() like that in the loop. If you need to loop over a collection and modify it in that loop, you need to use an explicit Iterator. –  Joachim Sauer Feb 9 '11 at 16:15
1  
Using new Integer() is more expensive than using auto-boxing as the later uses a cache of Integer's (and its longer to write/read) –  Peter Lawrey Feb 9 '11 at 16:21
    
@Peter, actually Integer.valueOf(int) is kind of controversial, it makes the JVM unable to optimize the code b/c it's not sure if the allocation is going to happen or not (it works only for -128 - +127 which is quite limited). In that particular case the allocation 'escapes' but in others it doesn't and new Integer() would have been just as fine (or better) –  bestsss Feb 9 '11 at 16:42
    
Running some simple tests, I don't see any evidence that Integer.valueOf() is optimised any less than new Integer() –  Peter Lawrey Feb 9 '11 at 16:54
    
@bestsss, I have found one micro-benchmark where new Integer() saves 300 ns; when the objects are always discarded. In the case of using n++, using valueOf was about 200 ns faster. Such micro-benchamrks are very sensitive to what else you are trying to do. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 9 '11 at 17:12

Since all the answers are about immutability, here how it would look with a mutable type:

import java.util.concurrent.AtomicInteger;


List<AtomicInteger> list = new LinkedList<AtomicInteger>();
list.add(new AtomicInteger(1));
list.add(new AtomicInteger(2));
list.add(new AtomicInteger(3));

for (AtomicInteger i : list)
    i.getAndIncrement();

System.out.println(list.get(0));

This should output 2. (AtomicInteger additionally has these thread-safety properties, but we need here only the mutability.)

The primitive type int (as all primitives) is immutable, too, so the following variant would still output 1:

int[] list = new int[]{ 1, 2, 3};

for (int i : list)
    i++;

System.out.println(list[0]);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.