Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is what I've been trying to do

Build an ASP.NET MVC 3 application with forms authentication and active directory membership. The web server and database are different physical servers hence a double hop.

I thought the answer was this older article on constrained delegation and protocol transition? So far, I have not been able to get the technique to work.

I'm testing this from my DEV machine (Windows 7, IIS7) for the web server before deploying to windows 2008 (IIS7) in the production setup. Would windows 2008 make a difference?

What works and what fails

I'm able to login with forms auth and the AD membership. This seem to be working fine. When I try to make a database call using this code:

public void AsUser(Action action)
    {
        using (var id = new WindowsIdentity(User.Identity.Name + @"@example.com"))
        {
            WindowsImpersonationContext context = null;
            try
            {
                context = id.Impersonate();
                action.Invoke();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                // ex.Message is The type initializer for System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection threw an exception
                // buried inner exeption is Requested registry access is not allowed
            }
            finally
            {
                if (context != null)
                {
                    context.Undo();
                }
            }
        }
    }

It fails with an exception leading me to believe I have setup issues on my local DEV server. The inner exception is Requested registry access is not allowed.

If I set a breakpoint and inspect the WindowsIdentity after the Impersonate() call I see that the ImpersonationLevel is set to Identification. This seems like a clue that it is not setup correctly. Can anyone confirm?

Am I on the right track and is this even possible to setup? Any pointers would be appreciated.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+100

I think you are on the right track. You just need more troubleshooting work on your protocol transition setup.

I assume you configured your Active Directory membership provider correctly so that you can successfully logon your web page using the active directory user name and password. If that's not the case, please ignore the rest of my answer :)

From what I saw in your question, you got your user's token using S4USelf by WindowsIdentity. Then, you are using S4UProxy to pass the impersonated token to SQL server. Since you said you got ImpersonationLevel.Identification only, it means you failed to do protocol transition.

You need to understand that allowing one machine to do protocol transition in a domain is very high privilege. Granting a server to do protocol transition almost means that you trust that server to be almost like a domain controller. You need to consciously make this decision in AD to turn a server to have this ability and you have to be a domian administrator to make this change. If you haven't done this, you probably didn't setup your thing properly.

There are couple things to check.

First, make sure you selected "Trust this computer for delegation to specified services only" and then you picked "select Use any authentication protocol" on your service account. You may like to create a domain account. Here is a link on how to create a service account for ASP.NET. Remember, you need a domain account. After you created a domain service account, make sure you go to the delegation tab on that account and selected the correct options.

Second, you need to make sure SPNs are set properly. I realize that the link that you posted only mention the SPN of your ASP.NET service account. Actually, you also need to make sure the service account on your SQL server also set properly. Otheriwse, Windows won't use Kerberos authentication at all. It will fall back to use NTLM. There are a lot of details to setup a SPN correctly on SQL server. You can check here first and see if you have any luck. From my experience, most of the DBA don't know how to set them up properly. They don't even aware of it because most applications work fine with NTLM. You need to pay attention to the SQL server service account and the port number that it's using.

Third, you need to make sure there is nothing disabling your Kerberos delegation. Some sensitive AD accounts are by default not allowed to be delegated. For example, the built-in administrator account. So, you better use some other normal user accounts for testing purpose.

UPDATE

I just found another article teaching you how to setup the protocol transition for ASP.NET. It mentioned that you need to grant TCB right to the IIS service account in order to make sure it can create a Impersonation type WindowsIdentity. You can give it a shot.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for all the info. A lot of it was new to me. I haven't had time yet to reset everything and start with this new knowledge but I'm more confident that I can get it to work now. –  Aaron Wagner Feb 23 '11 at 13:32
    
This kinda sucks... with 13 minutes till the bounty was up I selected yours as the answer not realizing that that is different than "awarding" the bounty. You got half of what you should have. I'm sorry I didn't understand the system or maybe I missed the clues in the UI -- either way my bad. –  Aaron Wagner Feb 23 '11 at 14:59
    
@Aaron No worry. Thanks for accepting my answer. After you get the protocol transistion working, there are actually some more general kerberos problems that you may run into. E.g. if there are duplicated SPN in the same AD forest, Kerberos authentication will just stop working silently. It's very hard to write a complete answer to this kind of questions. If we can, MSDN won't need to have multiple articles and KB for similar problem. If you are running into some other AD issues, tag a question with active-directory. You may get more useful hints –  Harvey Kwok Feb 23 '11 at 16:25

Here the class I use. Also, you'll want to check and see if the process that the AppPool is running under has enough permission to do the impersonation since it is such a privileged activity. I would give the user account that the app pool is running under temporary admin privileges (dev box only of course) and see if it works so you'll know if it is a permissions issue.

public class ImpersonationHelper : IDisposable
    {
        private const int LOGON32_LOGON_INTERACTIVE = 2;
        private const int LOGON32_PROVIDER_DEFAULT = 0;
        private WindowsImpersonationContext _impersonationContext;
        private string _userName;
        private string _domain;
        private string _password;

        [DllImport("advapi32.dll")]
        public static extern int LogonUserA(String lpszUserName,
            String lpszDomain,
            String lpszPassword,
            int dwLogonType,
            int dwLogonProvider,
            ref IntPtr phToken);
        [DllImport("advapi32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true)]
        public static extern int DuplicateToken(IntPtr hToken,
            int impersonationLevel,
            ref IntPtr hNewToken);

        [DllImport("advapi32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true)]
        public static extern bool RevertToSelf();

        [DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
        public static extern bool CloseHandle(IntPtr handle);

        public ImpersonationHelper(string domain, string userName, string password)
        {
            _userName = userName;
            _domain = domain;
            _password = password;
        }

        public void Start()
        {
            WindowsIdentity tempWindowsIdentity;
            IntPtr token = IntPtr.Zero;
            IntPtr tokenDuplicate = IntPtr.Zero;

            if (RevertToSelf())
            {
                if (LogonUserA(_userName, _domain, _password, LOGON32_LOGON_INTERACTIVE,
                    LOGON32_PROVIDER_DEFAULT, ref token) != 0)
                {
                    if (DuplicateToken(token, 2, ref tokenDuplicate) != 0)
                    {
                        tempWindowsIdentity = new WindowsIdentity(tokenDuplicate);
                        _impersonationContext = tempWindowsIdentity.Impersonate();
                        if (_impersonationContext != null)
                        {
                            CloseHandle(token);
                            CloseHandle(tokenDuplicate);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            if (token != IntPtr.Zero)
                CloseHandle(token);
            if (tokenDuplicate != IntPtr.Zero)
                CloseHandle(tokenDuplicate);
        }

        #region IDisposable Members

        void IDisposable.Dispose()
        {
            if (_impersonationContext != null)
            {
                _impersonationContext.Undo();
            }
        }

        #endregion
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the code. I hope to stay in happy managed land without the extern calls, but if it comes to this I'll give it a shot. –  Aaron Wagner Feb 23 '11 at 13:32

Have you enabled Impersonation on the Windows 7 or Windows 2008 machine? This article covers how to set it up. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc730708(WS.10).aspx. Also, are you running 32-bit or 64-bit?

share|improve this answer
    
64-bit. Would this matter? –  Aaron Wagner Feb 21 '11 at 22:14
    
Sometimes. In this case I doubt it. More information is always better though –  Spidy Feb 21 '11 at 22:17

You should also check with your AD administration to see if Impersonation is allowed. My companies AD policies won't allow impersonation.

share|improve this answer

I think you have identified the problem but no one has mentioned it. The "double hop" issue is not going to allow you to do this. It's not possible. There are lots of people who have written about it such as Scott Forsyth.

When you authenticate to the IIS server using Integrated Authentication, that uses up your first 'hop'. When IIS tries to access a network device, that would be the double or second hop which is not allowed. IIS cannot in turn pass on those credentials to the next network device, otherwise the developer or administrator could abuse your credentials and use them in ways that the site visitor didn't anticipate.

This doesn't occur with anonymous access or with impersonation off because in that case IIS takes care of authenticating you and then it uses a different user for local or network access. This means that the app pool identity or anonymous user can make a network call as the first hop.

I think it's pretty clear that you cannot pass your credentials any further than the first connection.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.