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Which files should I include in .gitignore when using Git in conjunction with Xcode?

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15 Answers 15

up vote 397 down vote accepted

Mods: Please not approve edits to this answer. So far, every edit has been INCORRECT and causes DATA LOSS. Please leave this answer alone!


If you want to edit this answer ... don't. Read the whole thing first - there's an easy way for you to make your own fork, and if that's not enough then comment on it.


I was previously using the top-voted answer, but it needs a bit of cleanup, so here it is re-done for Xcode 4, with some improvements.

I've researched every file in this list, but several of them do not exist in Apple's official xcode docs, so I had to go on Apple mailing lists.

Apple continues to add undocumented files, potentially corrupting our live projects. This IMHO is unacceptable, and I've now started logging bugs against it each time they do so. I know they don't care, but maybe it'll shame one of them into treating developers more fairly.


If you need to customize, here's a gist you can fork: https://gist.github.com/3786883


#########################
# .gitignore file for Xcode4 and Xcode5 Source projects
#
# Apple bugs, waiting for Apple to fix/respond:
#
#    15564624 - what does the xccheckout file in Xcode5 do? Where's the documentation?
#
# Version 2.1
# For latest version, see: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/49478/git-ignore-file-for-xcode-projects
#
# 2013 updates:
# - fixed the broken "save personal Schemes"
# - added line-by-line explanations for EVERYTHING (some were missing)
#
# NB: if you are storing "built" products, this WILL NOT WORK,
# and you should use a different .gitignore (or none at all)
# This file is for SOURCE projects, where there are many extra
# files that we want to exclude
#
#########################

#####
# OS X temporary files that should never be committed
#
# c.f. http://www.westwind.com/reference/os-x/invisibles.html

.DS_Store

# c.f. http://www.westwind.com/reference/os-x/invisibles.html

.Trashes

# c.f. http://www.westwind.com/reference/os-x/invisibles.html

*.swp

# *.lock - this is used and abused by many editors for many different things.
#    For the main ones I use (e.g. Eclipse), it should be excluded 
#    from source-control, but YMMV

*.lock

#
# profile - REMOVED temporarily (on double-checking, this seems incorrect; I can't find it in OS X docs?)
#profile


####
# Xcode temporary files that should never be committed
# 
# NB: NIB/XIB files still exist even on Storyboard projects, so we want this...

*~.nib


####
# Xcode build files -
#
# NB: slash on the end, so we only remove the FOLDER, not any files that were badly named "DerivedData"

DerivedData/

# NB: slash on the end, so we only remove the FOLDER, not any files that were badly named "build"

build/


#####
# Xcode private settings (window sizes, bookmarks, breakpoints, custom executables, smart groups)
#
# This is complicated:
#
# SOMETIMES you need to put this file in version control.
# Apple designed it poorly - if you use "custom executables", they are
#  saved in this file.
# 99% of projects do NOT use those, so they do NOT want to version control this file.
#  ..but if you're in the 1%, comment out the line "*.pbxuser"

# .pbxuser: http://lists.apple.com/archives/xcode-users/2004/Jan/msg00193.html

*.pbxuser

# .mode1v3: http://lists.apple.com/archives/xcode-users/2007/Oct/msg00465.html

*.mode1v3

# .mode2v3: http://lists.apple.com/archives/xcode-users/2007/Oct/msg00465.html

*.mode2v3

# .perspectivev3: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5223297/xcode-projects-what-is-a-perspectivev3-file

*.perspectivev3

#    NB: also, whitelist the default ones, some projects need to use these
!default.pbxuser
!default.mode1v3
!default.mode2v3
!default.perspectivev3


####
# Xcode 4 - semi-personal settings
#
#
# OPTION 1: ---------------------------------
#     throw away ALL personal settings (including custom schemes!
#     - unless they are "shared")
#
# NB: this is exclusive with OPTION 2 below
xcuserdata

# OPTION 2: ---------------------------------
#     get rid of ALL personal settings, but KEEP SOME OF THEM
#     - NB: you must manually uncomment the bits you want to keep
#
# NB: this *requires* git v1.8.2 or above; you may need to upgrade to latest OS X,
#    or manually install git over the top of the OS X version
# NB: this is exclusive with OPTION 1 above
#
#xcuserdata/**/*

#     (requires option 2 above): Personal Schemes
#
#!xcuserdata/**/xcschemes/*

####
# XCode 4 workspaces - more detailed
#
# Workspaces are important! They are a core feature of Xcode - don't exclude them :)
#
# Workspace layout is quite spammy. For reference:
#
# /(root)/
#   /(project-name).xcodeproj/
#     project.pbxproj
#     /project.xcworkspace/
#       contents.xcworkspacedata
#       /xcuserdata/
#         /(your name)/xcuserdatad/
#           UserInterfaceState.xcuserstate
#     /xcsshareddata/
#       /xcschemes/
#         (shared scheme name).xcscheme
#     /xcuserdata/
#       /(your name)/xcuserdatad/
#         (private scheme).xcscheme
#         xcschememanagement.plist
#
#

####
# Xcode 4 - Deprecated classes
#
# Allegedly, if you manually "deprecate" your classes, they get moved here.
#
# We're using source-control, so this is a "feature" that we do not want!

*.moved-aside

####
# Xcode 5 - VCS file
# The data in this file not represent state of your project.
# If you'll leave this file in git - you will have merge conflicts during 
# pull your cahnges to other's repo
#
*.xccheckout

####
# UNKNOWN: recommended by others, but I can't discover what these files are
#
# ...none. Everything is now explained.
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1  
Ok, I just noticed a problem with this. I was doing some git acrobatics, and when I checkout out back to master and applied my stashed changes, I had lost my saved build schemes! fortunately, I had backed them up, just in case... but the solution is to ignore a little more specifically inside the xcuserdata directory. I changed xcuserdata to xcdebugger and UserInterfaceState.xcuserstate, which are really the offensive ones to commit. –  samson Nov 2 '12 at 21:45
11  
You shouldn't be ignoring *.lock or Podfile.lock (never mind the redundancy). You want the exact same versions installed in all workspaces, you don't want the "latest version". –  tvon Apr 17 '13 at 13:58
11  
Please update for Xcode 5! Thanks! –  Hyperbole Oct 8 '13 at 16:18
4  
Hi! update for Xcode5: Just add *.xccheckout to this file. –  skywinder Nov 11 '13 at 13:38
3  
@Adam As I can see, this file contains VCS metadata, and should therefore not be checked into the VCS. No, there no mentions on developer.apple.com about xccheckout. But on official github page, this file included already in the gitignore file. https://github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/Objective-C.gitignore –  skywinder Nov 13 '13 at 4:20

Based on this guide for Mercurial my .gitignore includes:

.DS_Store
*.swp
*~.nib

build/

*.pbxuser
*.perspective
*.perspectivev3

I've also chosen to include:

*.mode1v3
*.mode2v3

which, according to this Apple mailing list post, are "user-specific project settings".

And for Xcode 4:

xcuserdata
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51  
I don't particularly like the .pbxuser/.perspective/*.perspectivev3 patterns. I much prefer the following .xcodeproj/ !*.xcodeproj/project.pbxproj That ignores everything inside a *.xcodeproj except the project.pbxproj. –  Kevin Ballard Mar 15 '09 at 20:33
5  
I do not ignore *.pbxuser, *.perspective and *.perspectivev3 because I like to keep those settings back when I clone my repository. –  lajos May 27 '09 at 5:57
7  
Also you might want to add that you can make a "global" gitignore file like this: git config --global core.excludesfile ~/.gitignore –  Jess Bowers Apr 27 '10 at 14:56
49  
I'd like to caution everyone who added .gitignore file after they have committed the project: those files you ignore are still being tracked. You'll have to remove them from git manually using git rm --cached <files> –  pixelfreak Jun 27 '11 at 1:44
19  
@SpacyRicochet: Comment formatting has apparently changed since I wrote the comment. Hence the italics. My pattern is supposed to look like *.xcodeproj/* !*.xcodeproj/project.pbxproj. Of course, these days you do need to adjust it for workspaces. –  Kevin Ballard May 10 '12 at 19:14

For Xcode 4 I also add:

YourProjectName.xcodeproj/xcuserdata/*
YourProjectName.xcodeproj/project.xcworkspace/xcuserdata/*
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70  
If you just add xcuserdata, then that takes care of both. –  MattDiPasquale Apr 12 '11 at 18:13
1  
For some reason just adding xcuserdata without the prefix didn't work for me. I thought it should, though. Odd. –  badcat Dec 2 '13 at 14:22

Regarding the 'build' directory exclusion -

If you place your build files in a different directory from your source, as I do, you don't have the folder in the tree to worry about.

This also makes life simpler for sharing your code, preventing bloated backups, and even when you have dependencies to other Xcode projects (while require the builds to be in the same directory as each other)

You can grab an up-to-date copy from the Github gist https://gist.github.com/708713

My current .gitignore file is

# Mac OS X
*.DS_Store

# Xcode
*.pbxuser
*.mode1v3
*.mode2v3
*.perspectivev3
*.xcuserstate
project.xcworkspace/
xcuserdata/

# Generated files
*.o
*.pyc


#Python modules
MANIFEST
dist/
build/

# Backup files
*~.nib
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7  
I do have the build folder outside of the project folder, but when other users build the project, it by default is recreated in the project- so I found that adding it to the ignore file is a better solution, otherwise it gets readded in their commits. –  lajos May 27 '09 at 5:53

I included these suggestions in a Gist I created on Github: http://gist.github.com/137348

Feel free to fork it, and make it better.

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5  
Also one of the Github guys has collected some .gitignore files. Here is the Objective-C specific one- github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/Objective-C.gitignore –  program247365 Jul 26 '11 at 4:11
    
Also the Thoughtbot folks came up with this project - github.com/thoughtbot/liftoff which will add a sane default .gitignore files, see their blog post on it: robots.thoughtbot.com/post/33796217972/… –  program247365 Jun 25 '13 at 2:26

Heres a script I made to auto create your .gitignore and .gitattributes files using Xcode... I hacked it together with a few other people's stuff. Have fun!

Xcode-Git-User-Script

No warranties... I suck at most of this - so use at your own peril

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I'm using both AppCode and XCode. So .idea/ should be ignored.

append this to Adam's .gitignore

####
# AppCode
.idea/
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Mine is a .bzrignore, but same idea :)

.DS_Store
*.mode1v3
*.pbxuser
*.perspectivev3
*.tm_build_errors

the tm_build_errors is for when I use TextMate to build my project. Not quite as comprehensive as Hagelin but I thought it was worth posting for the tm_build_errors line.

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The people of GitHub have a pretty exhaustive and efficient .gitignore file for Xcode projects:Objective-C.gitignore

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5  
This has already been posted to one of the answers above. I found it to be: incorrect, questionably supported (more than 100 outstanding pull requests!), and undocumented. The fact that it's "incorrect" is the worst of all; they have made an ignore that only works for a narrow set of uses and haven't explained what or why! Hence: my answer above, which corrects their bugs AND explains what's being done and why, so you can make educated decisions on a project-by-project basis (on a new project, I sometimes forget why some of the items are in there - the comments help me decide :)) –  Adam Oct 14 '12 at 16:42

For XCode 5 I add:

####
# Xcode 5 - VCS metadata
#
*.xccheckout

From Berik's Answer

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I found that projects that included other project became broken when I include the xcworkspace files in my list of ignores.

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make them Global and not at the directory level so your not pushing them to others..

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I've added:

xcuserstate
xcsettings

and placed my .gitignore file at the root of my project.

After committing and pushing. I then ran:

git rm --cached UserInterfaceState.xcuserstate WorkspaceSettings.xcsettings

buried with the folder below:

<my_project_name>/<my_project_name>.xcodeproj/project.xcworkspace/xcuserdata/<my_user_name>.xcuserdatad/

I then ran git commit and push again

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Did you add it also? Or is this just all you do? –  hakre Sep 26 '12 at 8:41
1  
Yes, I added both but xcusersate was the main offending file. Adding that was the only way I could push my code remotely. Otherwise I was stuck in a feedback loop that required commit before push. So you commit, then Xcode 4.5 would ask you to commit again and you are never able to push because the pre req is committing. –  user1524957 Oct 2 '12 at 21:59

We did find that even if you add the .gitignore and the .gitattribte the *.pbxproj file can get corrupted. So we have a simple plan.

Every person that codes in office simply discards the changes made to this file. In the commit we simple mention the files that are added into the source. And then push to the server. Our integration manager than pulls and sees the commit details and adds the files into the resources.

Once he updates the remote everyone will always have a working copy. In case something is missing then we inform him to add it in and then pull once again.

This has worked out for us without any issues.

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Here is the .gitignore file I'm using

# Xcode
.DS_Store
*/build/*
*.pbxuser
!default.pbxuser
*.mode1v3
!default.mode1v3
*.mode2v3
!default.mode2v3
*.perspectivev3
!default.perspectivev3
xcuserdata
profile
*.moved-aside
DerivedData
.idea/
*.hmap
*.xccheckout
*.xcworkspace
!default.xcworkspace

#CocoaPods
Pods
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