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So I have a Post and a User.
Post has_many users and a user belongs_to a post.
I need a find that will find all the Posts that dont have any users like the following:

Post.first.users
 => [] 
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8 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Post.where("id not in (select post_id from users)")

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If the subquery contains a nil, nothing will be returned and you might want to use NOT EXISTS instead, like I needed to in my particular case. Further reading. –  onemanarmy Jul 5 '13 at 15:20
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The brutal approach would be to:

Post.all.select {|p| p.users.count == 0 }

You may try to use a direct SQL, which may be somehow more efficient, but for start, use the most readable construction.

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Post.first.users.empty? should be sufficient if users returns an array.

If you want to check for each post you could do

Post.each do |p| if p.users.empty? do whatever end end

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i need to find all the Posts...not just the first –  Trace Feb 9 '11 at 16:47
    
so i need something like Post.all(:include => :users, :conditions => "users = ?", nil) –  Trace Feb 9 '11 at 16:48
    
Post.each do |p| if p.users == nil do whatever end end –  acconrad Feb 9 '11 at 16:50
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If you need something that is fast, employ a SQL statement like:

SELECT * 
FROM posts p LEFT OUTER JOIN users u ON p.id = u.post_id 
WHERE u.id IS null
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i guess a sql with in can cause performance problems if database table has many rows. careful with that

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Right. Start with the most readable code, secure it with tests, and then you may start to optimize the performance. Without tests, you risk that you "optimize away" some records by accident. And always measure the real performance: optimized version is not always the fastest. –  Arsen7 Feb 9 '11 at 17:07
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something like that:

p = Post.arel_table
u = User.arel_table

posts = Post.find_by_sql(p.join(u).on(p[:user_id].eq(u[:p_id])).where(u[:id].eq(nil)).to_sql) 
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I know this is tagged as Rails 3, but if you are using Rails 4, I've been doing it like this.

Post.where.not(user_id: User.pluck(:id))
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Learned this one just today:

Post.eager_load(:users).merge(User.where(id: nil))

Works with Rails 4+ at least.

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