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I'm taking a C# class right now and I'm trying to find out the best way of doing things. I come from a Java background and so I'm only familiar with Java best-practices; I'm a C# novice!

In Java if I have a private property, I do this;

private String name;

public void setName(String name) {
   this.name = name;
}

public String getName() {
   return this.name;
}

In C#, I see that there are many ways of doing this.

I can do it like Java:

private string name;

public void setName(string name) {
   this.name = name;
}

public string getName() {
   return this.name;
}

Or I can do it this way:

private string name;

public string Name {
   get { return name; }
   set { name = value; }
}

Or:

public string Name { get; set; }

Which one should I use, and what are the caveats or subtleties involved with each approach? When creating classes, I am following general best-practices that I know from Java (especially reading Effective Java). So for example, I am favoring immutability (providing setters only when necessary). I'm just curious to see how these practices fit in with the various ways of providing setters and getters in C#; essentially, how would I translate best-practices from the Java world into C#?

EDIT

I was posting this as a comment to Jon Skeet's answer but then it got long:

What about a non-trivial property (i.e., with significant processing and validation perhaps)? Could I still expose it via a public property but with the logic encapsulated in get and set? Why would/should I do this over having dedicated setter and getter methods (with associated processing and validation logic).

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11 Answers 11

up vote 41 down vote accepted

I'd use the last of these, for a trivial property. Note that I'd call this a public property as both the getters and setters are public.

Immutability is a bit of a pain with automatically implemented properties - you can't write an auto-property which only has a getter; the closest you can come is:

public string Foo { get; private set; }

which isn't really immutable... just immutable outside your class. So you may wish to use a real read-only property instead:

private readonly string foo;
public string Foo { get { return foo; } }

You definitely don't want to write getName() and setName(). In some cases it makes sense to write Get/Set methods rather than using properties, particularly if they could be expensive and you wish to emphasize that. However, you'd want to follow the .NET naming convention of PascalCase for methods, and you wouldn't want a trivial property like this to be implemented with normal methods anyway - a property is much more idiomatic here.

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3  
More exact: any code reiew will point out the java way is a hack that is bypassing valid langauge AND (!) runtime constructs and kill the usage of the property as proeprty (i.e. object.property = "value"). In some teams this would result in a nice talk about attitude - depending on seniority combined with an incentive to put that attitude to use at a competitor. Seriously, DONT FIGHT THE LANGAUGE. Especially as the java "way" is a hack that was choosen in order not to modify the langauge for real property support. –  TomTom Feb 9 '11 at 18:24
1  
I guess the good news is my response doesn't seem to contradict anything you mentioned. The bad news is your fingers are far faster than mine. Great insight, and thanks for the added detail. –  jeremyalan Feb 9 '11 at 18:37
4  
To answer you edit: you can use the get/set methods with any amount of logic in them that you'd like. We often do this, especially for validation. Best practice, however, is not to have a lot of slow logic (database access for example), dangerous logic (exception throwing), or mutation (changing a lot of state) in the properties. A property is expected to act more or less like a simple state. Anything more should be indicated by using a function instead. –  CodexArcanum Feb 9 '11 at 20:38
    
@CodexArcanum: Yup, absolutely right. –  Jon Skeet Feb 9 '11 at 21:05
1  
@rtindru: Yes, I'm aware of that. It's entirely possible to write a read-only property. But you can't declare an automatically-implemented property without a set accessor. –  Jon Skeet Jun 25 '13 at 10:02

If all you need is a variable to store some data:

public string Name { get; set; }

Want it to be immutable?

public string Name { get; private set; }

Want to do some value checking before assigning the property?

public string Name 
{
   get { return m_name; }
   set
   {
      if (value == null)
         throw new ArgumentNullException("value");

      m_name = value;
   }
}

In general, the GetXyz() and SetXyz() are only used in certain cases, and you just have to use your gut on when it feels right. In general, I would say that I expect most get/set properties to not contain a lot of logic and have very few, if any, unexpected side effects. If reading a property value requires invoking a service or getting input from a user in order to build the object that I'm requesting, then I would wrap it into a method, and call it something like BuildXyz(), rather than GetXyz().

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I would not throw exceptions in properties, I'd rather use method setters with contracts to specify such specific behavior. If a property is of type int, I'd expect every int to qualify. Something which calls for exception throwing is not simple in my opinion, INotifyPropertyChanged type invocations are more in that line according to me. –  flindeberg Jan 19 '12 at 9:08
    
@jeremyalan Great Explanation –  Ankur Sharma Jun 14 '13 at 10:45
    
private setter != immutable –  piedar May 15 at 15:52

Use properties in C#, not get/set methods. They are there for your convenience and it is idiomatic.

As for your two C# examples, one is simply syntactic sugar for the other. Use the auto property if all you need is a simple wrapper around an instance variable, use the full version when you need to add logic in the getter and/or setter.

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public string Name { get; set; }

This is simply a auto-implemented property, and is technically the same as a normal property. A backing field will be created when compiling.

All properties are eventually converted to functions, so the actual compiled implementation in the end is the same as you are used to in Java.

Use auto-implemented properties when you don't have to do specific operations on the backing field. Use a ordinary property otherwise. Use get and set functions when the operation has side effects or is computationally expensive, use properties otherwise.

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Regardless of which way you choose in C# the end result is the same. You will get a backinng variable with separate getter and setter methods. By using properties you are following best practices and so it's a matter of how verbose you want to get.

Personally I would choose auto-properties, the last version: public string Name { get; set; }, since they take up the least amount of space. And you can always expand these in the future if you need add something like validation.

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Whenever possible I prefer public string Name { get; set; } as it's terse and easily readable. However, there may be times when this one is necessary

private string name;

public string Name {
   get { return name; }
   set { name = value; }
}
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1  
can you explain when and why that kind of thing is necessary? –  Jesper Feb 9 '11 at 20:17
    
lolz@jasper... good question ! –  explorer Feb 9 '11 at 21:04
    
Right now I cannot think of a reason to use the 2nd version. I only said 'may be times when this is necessary'. I hate to use absolutes unless I'm positive. –  SquidScareMe Feb 10 '11 at 14:24
2  
And why is this 'lolz'? You can show your support for a comment by upvoting. –  SquidScareMe Feb 10 '11 at 14:24

In C# favor properties for exposing private fields for get and/or set. The thie form you mention is an autoproperty where the get and set automatically generate a hidden pivot backing field for you.

I favor auto properties when possible but you should never do a set/get method pair in C#.

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As mentioned, all of these approaches result in the same outcome. The most important thing is that you pick a convention and stick with it. I prefer using the last two property examples.

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In C# the preferred way is through properties rather than getX() and setX() methods. Also, note that C# does not require that properties have both a get and a set - you can have get-only properties and set-only properties.

public boolean MyProperty
{
    get { return something; }
}

public boolean MyProperty
{
    set { this.something = value; }
}
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First let me try to explain what you wrote:

// private member -- not a property
private string name;

/// public method -- not a property
public void setName(string name) {
   this.name = name;
}

/// public method -- not a property
public string getName() {
   return this.name;
}

// yes it is property structure before .Net 3.0
private string name;
public string Name {
   get { return name; }
   set { name = value; }
}

This structure is also used nowadays but it is most suitable if you want to do some extra functionality, for instance when a value is set you can it to parse to capitalize it and save it in private member for alter internal use.

With .net framework 3.0

// this style is introduced, which is more common, and suppose to be best
public string Name { get; set; }

//You can more customize it
public string Name
{
    get;
    private set;    // means value could be set internally, and accessed through out
}

Wish you better luck in C#

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like most of the answers here, use Automatic properties. Intuitive, less lines of code and it is more clean. If you should serialize your class, mark the class [Serializable]/ with [DataConract] attribute. And if you are using [DataContract] mark the member with

[DataMember(Name="aMoreFriendlyName")]
public string Name { get; set; }

Private or public setter depends on your preference.

Also note that automatic properties require both getters and setters(public or private).

/*this is invalid*/
public string Name 
{ 
    get; 
   /* setter omitted to prove the point*/
}

Alternatively, if you only want get/set, create a backing field yourself

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