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I'm running through some example programs to refamiliarize myself with C++ and I have run into the following question. First, here is the example code:

void print_string(const char * the_string)
{
    cout << the_string << endl;
}

int main () {
    print_string("What's up?");
}

In the above code, the parameter to print_string could have instead been const char * const the_string. Which would be more correct for this?

I understand that the difference is that one is a pointer to a constant character, while one is a constant pointer to a constant character. But why do both of these work? When would it be relevant?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 99 down vote accepted

The latter prevents you from modifying the_string inside print_string. It would actually be appropriate here, but perhaps the verbosity put off the developer.

char* the_string : I can change the char to which the_string points, and I can modify the char at which it points.

const char* the_string : I can change the char to which the_string points, but I cannot modify the char at which it points.

char* const the_string : I cannot change the char to which the_string points, but I can modify the char at which it points.

const char* const the_string : I cannot change the char to which the_string points, nor can I modify the char at which it points.

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8  
+1 for the last sentence. Const-correctness is verbose, but well worth it. –  mskfisher Feb 9 '11 at 19:08
3  
@mskfisher: One reason I force myself to write char const*. –  Xeo Feb 9 '11 at 19:24
3  
@Xeo: your form is even more confusing because it's one transposition away from changing its meaning entirely. const char * is much better because the const is on the complete opposite side. –  R.. Feb 9 '11 at 19:55
2  
@R..: Well, at least for me it's not. Reading from right to left, I get "pointer to const char". For me, it just feels better that way. –  Xeo Feb 9 '11 at 20:49
3  
Well you're fooling yourself because C types are read from the inside out, not from the left to right. :-) –  R.. Feb 9 '11 at 20:54

const char * p; --> Mutable pointer to a constant character

char * const p; --> constant pointer to a mutable character

const char * const p; --> constant pointer to a constant character

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const char * const means pointer as well as the data the pointer pointed to, are both const!

const char * means only the data the pointer pointed to, is const. pointer itself however is not const.

Example.

const char *p = "Nawaz";
p[2] = 'S'; //error, changing the const data!
p="Sarfaraz"; //okay, changing the non-const pointer. 

const char * const p = "Nawaz";
p[2] = 'S'; //error, changing the const data!
p="Sarfaraz"; //error, changing the const pointer. 
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Many people suggest reading the type specifier from right to left.

const char * // Pointer to a `char` that is constant, it can't be changed.
const char * const // A const pointer to const data.

In both forms, the pointer is pointing to constant or read-only data.

In the second form, the pointer cannot be changed; the pointer will always point to the same place.

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The difference is that without the extra const the programmer could change, inside the method, where the pointer points to; for example:

 void print_string(const char * the_string)
 {
    cout << the_string << endl;
    //....
    the_string = another_string();
    //....

 }

That would be instead illegal if the signature were void print_string(const char * const the_string)

Many programmers feel too verbose (in most scenarios) the extra const keyword and omit it, even though it would be semantically correct.

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In the latter you are guaranteeing not to modify both pointer and character in the first you only guarantee that the contents will not change but you may move the pointer around

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Ahh so without the final const, I could actually set the pointer to point to an entirely different string? –  pict Feb 9 '11 at 19:07
    
Yes, without that final const you can use the parameter pointer to do some iteration by pointer arithmetic, where if there was that const you had to create your own pointer which is a copy of that parameter. –  Jesus Ramos Feb 9 '11 at 19:12

There's no reason why either one wouldn't work. All print_string() does is print the value. It doesn't try to modify it.

It's a good idea to make function that don't modify mark arguments as const. The advantage is that variables that can't change (or you don't want to change) can be passed to these functions without error.

As far as the exact syntax, you want to indicate which type of arguments are "safe" to be passed to the function.

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I think it's vary rarely relevant, because your function isn't getting called with arguments like &*the_string or **the_string. The pointer itself is a value-type argument, so even if you modify it you're not going to change the copy that was used to call your function. The version you're showing ensures that the string will not change, and I think that's sufficient in this case.

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The difference between the two is that char* can point to any arbitrary pointer. Const char* by contrast, points to constants defined in the DATA section of the executable. And, as such, you cannot modify the character values of a const char* string.

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I'm not asking the difference between char* and const char*. I'm asking between const char* and const char* const –  pict Feb 9 '11 at 19:05

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