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please consider these styles:

a:link { color: blue }
a:visited { color: red }
a:hover { color: green }
a:active { color: black }
#special:link { color: pink }

And now this markup:

<a href="#">Normal link</a>
<a href="#" id="special">Special link</a>

I expect the "special" link to be pink while keeping the other colors. However, pink replaces the other colors.

Why is this happening? How could I fix it? Thank you.

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I believe it has to do with CSS priority order.

Because #special is an ID, it dwarfs any element-level style applied. (This can be proven in Firefox Firebug/Chrome Inspector and how the inherited style sheets are all over-written by the ID's style).

Though, considering there is no "present style" applied for :active, :visited, etc. It would stand to reason these styles would still be un-affected. Yet, making the following change to your hover seems to kick it back in to gear:

a:hover { color: green !important; }
share|improve this answer
    
This works, but !important is dirty. Is there really no way to do this without it? – Yahel Feb 9 '11 at 19:32
    
@yc: Based on the W3 link I provided, :hover should inherit through on the premise that #special doesn't define a :hover. But, the CSS weight seems to override it (#special:link->"0,1,0,1" and a:hover->`0,0,0,2"). But my feeling is that pseudo-classes stay at the level they're declared at and don't "cascade" as they should, or at least in cases of IDs. – Brad Christie Feb 9 '11 at 19:38
    
I do not think the style are overidden because of the ID here. I'd rather say the :link styles apply to all states (unvisited links but also :visited, :hover and :active) – LapinLove404 Feb 9 '11 at 20:24
    
@LapinLove404: Check it out any any of your preference for browsers, the ID style overrides the previous styles, regardless of the pseudo-class applied. For instance, a:hover does apply, but #special:link 's color property overrides that which is in the hover. – Brad Christie Feb 9 '11 at 20:52
    
Replace #special:link { color: pink } with a:link { color: pink } and you'll have the same behavior. Of course, using an ID means that even if you set the style for #special:link before the a:hover it will be prioritized. But the main reason here is that all links have the pseudo class :link. – LapinLove404 Feb 10 '11 at 9:09

Why is this happening?

Styles for the :link pseudo-class apply to all links states, so it includes :hover, :visited and :active

This is what I have observed since I started using CSS years ago. I don't know if it's how it is supposed to work but it is how I have seen it working and expect it to work.

So when, you set a style for #special:link, that style also applies to #special:hover, #special:visited and #special:active

Note that the use of an ID does not change much here.
If you try it with the below CSS, you will have both links pink... even for :hover state

a:link { color: blue }
a:visited { color: red }
a:hover { color: green }
a:active { color: black }
a:link { color: pink }

How could I fix it?

You can use !important as suggested by Brad or set the various states styles for #special together with the regular links.

a:link { color: blue }
#special:link { color: pink }
a:visited, #special:visited { color: red }
a:hover, #special:hover { color: green }
a:active, #special:active { color: black }
share|improve this answer
    
Thinking about it, it actually make sense : pseudo-classes work just like classes. :link works like a class that all <a> tags with an href have. – LapinLove404 Feb 9 '11 at 20:30
    
This should have been the accepted answer. !important is never the answer. – Mr Lister Dec 12 '13 at 10:17

Its aggravating...and order matters here:

a:hover{
color:green;
}

a:visited{
color:red;
}

This means that unvisited links will turn green when you hover over them, and visited links will stay red when you hover on them.

Switch:

a:visited{
color:red;
}

a:hover{
color:green;
}

This means that both visited links and unvisited links will turn green when you hover on them. I hate that the order of these properties changes the behavior; the hover style should take effect regardless.

a:link{
    color:blue;
}

a.one:hover{
    color:green;
}
a.one:visited{
    color:red;
}

a.two:visited{
    color:red;
}
a.two:hover{
    color:green;
}
<a href=#ddd class=one>One (wont change color on hover when visited)</a> |
<a href=#ddd class=two>Two (always turns green on hover)</a>

share|improve this answer

Here is another quick way around:

You can use :not(:hover).

#special:link:not(:hover) { color: pink }

DMOE

share|improve this answer
    
And we have a winner! In a situation where I couldn't modify the original css rules for links, this definitely turned out to be the best way to go. – Chris Nov 9 '15 at 21:44

No, it is not going to use the other colors because of its ID, in such case you should add the rest of actions and colors to the ID.

For example, the link that you have, the "special" one, when over will say.

Ok, I'm 'a' ... link ... and my ID is .. special, so, I will keep the special parameters.

That's why that's not going to change.

Hope this helps,

share|improve this answer
2  
What? So you're saying that div { ... } doesn't apply to <div id="foo"> because it has an ID? You really firmly believe that? – Brad Christie Feb 9 '11 at 19:25
    
Have to agree with Brad. jsfiddle.net/9CBgt/2 is proof that div rules aren't totally over-ridden by #foo rules, only when they are explicitly overriden. The text wouldn't be white in this case. – Yahel Feb 9 '11 at 19:53
    
If the id exists... yes at least that's what I've seen until now. – Marco Feb 9 '11 at 19:57

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