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I'm trying to understand how to select the right overloaded function template at compile-time, but the compiler is giving me a hard time. I can make it work, but I don't understand what is going on. Let me explain.

I have two structs A and B like below. One has a special function and the other a normal.

struct A
{
    void special() { std::cout << "special called.\n"; }
};

struct B
{
    void normal() { std::cout << "normal called.\n"; }
};

My intension is to have a mechanism, which at compile-time selects the right overloaded function template depending on if the special function is available. I have two functions run, which take the struct as a parameter, so they can call the appropriate function.

template<class Func, Func f> struct Sfinae {};

template <typename U>
static void run(U& u, Sfinae<void (U::*)(), &U::special>* = 0)
{
    u.special();
}

template <typename U>
static void run(U& u, ...)
{
    u.normal();
}

I've tested this with the following, with various results:

int main()
{
    A a;
    run<A>(a, 0); // works
    run<A>(a); // ERROR: ambiguous overloaded function
    run(a, 0); // ERROR: A has no member normal
    run(a); // ERROR: ambiguous overloaded function

    B b;
    run<B>(b, 0); // works
    run<B>(b); // works
    run(b, 0); // works
    run(b); // works

    return 0;
}

I'd like to use it as run(a) without any extra argument or <>. Is there something wrong with my code when this is not working?

Also, I'm interested to understand what is going on here and why this is deducing things like this, so I need to give <A> for A but not for B? I don't know what the standard says and if this is different between compilers, but at least gcc4.4.4 on Linux and gcc 4.0.1 on Mac work like I've described.

Can someone please shed some light on this? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Why are you using variadic paramters for the normal version of run? –  Zac Howland Feb 9 '11 at 19:32
    
@Zac: A variadic parameter is the worst match for overload resolution. The idea is that this overload should be selected only if there is nothing else that matches. –  Bo Persson Feb 9 '11 at 21:07
    
I get that, but for what he is showing, there is no need for it. –  Zac Howland Feb 10 '11 at 13:17
    
@Zac, could you please extend your comment? What I've showed is just something I tried to make simple to show the core parts which are involved and what I can see the compiler is accepting/rejecting. I'm interested to get an explanation why it is like this. –  murrekatt Feb 10 '11 at 14:42
    
From what you have described, the answer @Nawaz gave is all you need. That is, you don't appear to be doing anything with the variadic parameters in the function, so there is no need for them. Just specialize the template for the types you need specialized and leave the rest generalized. –  Zac Howland Feb 10 '11 at 15:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This here will work. It sort-of assumes that the two functions normal and special are mutually exclusive (i.e. a class that has one of them doesn't have the other). I'm sure you can adapt it to your purpose. This uses boost::enable_if, of course.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>

struct A
{
    void special() { std::cout << "special called.\n"; }
};

struct B
{
    void normal() { std::cout << "normal called.\n"; }
};

template<int> struct Sfinae { enum { value = true }; };

template <typename U>
static typename boost::enable_if<Sfinae<sizeof(&U::special)>,void>::type run(U& u)
{
    u.special();
}

template <typename U>
static typename boost::enable_if<Sfinae<sizeof(&U::normal)>,void>::type run(U& u)
{
    u.normal();
}


int main()
{
    A a;
    run(a); // works

    B b;
    run(b); // works

    return 0;
}

This works on gcc 4.6.0 on Linux.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mikael. This solves the problem, but I'm also interested to understand what I was seeing with the code I have. For instance, I thought ... is the last to match when deducing. Here it seems to not be the case if there is a default argument and no argument is passed to the function. I don't understand this and I don't know if this is expected behavior (standard). Any ideas about this? –  murrekatt Feb 10 '11 at 7:20

For this particular situation you can do this, which is very simple:

template <typename U>
static void run(U & u)
{
    u.special();
}

template <>
static void run<B>(B &u)
{
    u.normal();
}

Or, you can simply remove template, and write two overloaded functions. I agree, this doesn't solve it in more general way.

Maybe, this topic will help you finding a general solution:

Is it possible to write a C++ template to check for a function's existence?

See Johannes's answer. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Nawas. I know about this, however, it might be impractical if there are many A's and B's and I'd like to have code which works when things change as well. Say I add or remove B's or A's. Thanks also for the link. While I do want to solve what I'm trying to achieve, I'm also interested to understand that particular thing I've described. E.g. why is it like this? –  murrekatt Feb 10 '11 at 7:15

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