Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A project I'm working on requires me to be able to fire off an event everytime an item is added to a list. To achieve this, I created a custom List class inheriting from List and added a OnAdd event. I also want to return the item being added as EventArgs for which I added some more code (given below):

    public class ClientListObservable<Client>:List<Client>
    {
        public event EventHandler<EventArgs<Client>> OnAdd;

        public void Add(Client item)
        {
            if (null != OnAdd)
            {
                OnAdd(this, new EventArgs<Client>(item));
            }

            base.Add(item);
        }
    }

    public class EventArgs<Client> : EventArgs
    {
        public EventArgs(Client value)
        {
            m_value = value;
        }

        private Client m_value;

        public Client Value
        {
            get { return m_value; }
        }
    }

This is how I add a handler

clientList.OnAdd += new EventHandler<EventArgs<Client>>(clientList_OnAdd);

But, in the OnAdd method:

private void clientList_OnAdd(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //want to be able to access the data members of the Client object added
        }

I can only access e.Equals, e.GetHashCode, e.GetType and e.ToString, and none of the members of Client class.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Change your event args to:

public class ClientEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    public ClientEventArgs(Client value)
    {
        m_value = value;
    }

    private Client m_value;

    public Client Value
    {
        get { return m_value; }
    }
}

Then:

    private void clientList_OnAdd(object sender, ClientEventArgs e)
    {
        Client client = e.Value;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This is definitely cleaner than what I was implementing. –  xbonez Feb 9 '11 at 19:53

Create your own event args that extends EventArgs and has a public property of a "Client" object. Then on add populate the custom EventArgs with the new item and return it.

share|improve this answer

Shouldn't your event handler be declared like this:

private void clientList_OnAdd(object sender, EventArgs<Client> e)

?

share|improve this answer
    
The class declaration won't work, either, there... It's not EventHandler<T> here. There is no EventArgs<T>. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/3312134/… –  Reed Copsey Feb 9 '11 at 19:44
    
@Reed, I know -- I had assumed the OP had written that variant himself (which his code shows he did.) –  Kirk Woll Feb 9 '11 at 20:31

you should derive your custom class from EventArgs and have a member to host your custom objects in there, then you should invoke the event passing such specialized EventArgs which you would have created and initialized as needed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.