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So I've read a bunch of articles, both here on SO, and elsewhere, on the topic of shared variables, multiple threads and volatile.

If you consider the following code:

class C {
    int x;

public:
    C() : x(0) { }

    void Operation() {
        AcquireMutex();
        ++x;
        ReleaseMutex();
    }
};

Now, if I have understood everything I've read so far, this would be a correct way to update x, right? A correct compiler will not reorder the code, to cache the value of x before the call to AcquireMutex(), right?

I've always had a habit of tagging such variables with volatile. Something I picked up in school way back when dinosaurs roamed the lands, and never really reflected on it. After reading articles on the topic, it would seem that I have wasted a few minutes of my life typing out a (for these types of uses) useless keyword...

UPDATE: Ok, so if I change Operation() to this instead:

void Operation() {
    AcquireMutex();
    ++x;
    ReleaseMutex();
    AcquireMutex();
    ++x;
    ReleaseMutex();
}

Now, let's disregard the use of mutexes, and intrinsics such as InterlockedIncrement(), or whatever. It is kind of besides my point.

If x is not marked as volatile, will the code above be thread safe? Could it be that a compiler decides to hold the last value of x in a register after the first increment, and then just increment the register's value, and store that in memory at the last increment? If that is the case, then the code above is not thread safe. What gives? Will the compiler assume that after a call to any function, all cached variables are considered "dirty", thus forcing the compiler to issue read operations?

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Try to use Interlocked operations for this kind of situations, at least try to use CRITICAL_SECTION since it is more lightweigth than mutex on Windows. For cross platform code tbb::atomic can be devised. – ali_bahoo Feb 9 '11 at 21:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

volatile says nothing about atomicity. Its purpose is to prevent caching of memory locations that should not be cached (e.g., hardware device DMA ports.) (EDIT: This wording was in reference to "caching" by the generated code. For example, a non-volatile variable might be read from memory, then kept in a register indefinitely. Arkadiy offered a more precise definition in a comment, below.)

And as others have noted, no operation in C or C++ is guaranteed to be atomic. You're on your own to manage mutexes or other guards as needed.

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2  
To be more precise, "volatile" tells the compiler that the value at this location can be changed outside of the compiled code, so any optimization that relies on the value being same cannot be applied. – Arkadiy Feb 9 '11 at 21:39
    
Operations on sig_atomic_t variables are guaranteed atomic, at least with respect to signals. It doesn't (necessarily) mean anything with respect to threading, but just in case somebody has that feeling that "I'm sure I've seen something about an atomic type in C." – Jerry Coffin Feb 9 '11 at 21:42
    
@Jerry, sig_atomic_t provides atomic access to integer variables of a certain size -- a single read or write to these variables can't be interrupted by a signal. It does not guarantee that operations on these variables will be atomic. A ++ operation, for example, represents two accesses -- a read and a write. – Dan Breslau Feb 9 '11 at 21:55
    
It doesn't guarantee that all operations are atomic, but I have a hard time believing that anybody would honestly say that neither reading nor writing is an operation... – Jerry Coffin Feb 9 '11 at 21:57
    
@Jerry: I meant to provide this link in the previous comment: sourceware.org/ml/libc-alpha/2005-07/msg00004.html . It's not authoritative, but I think it describes the situation accurately. Specifically, it shows that sig_atomic_t provides atomic reads and writes from/to the variable; it does not provide atomic operations, which require both a read and a write. – Dan Breslau Feb 9 '11 at 22:05

I am not so sure Martin is right. Look at this:

InterlockedIncrement Function

If 32 bit incrementing was atomic, why the need for InterlockedIncremenet?

This being said, you should never use a mutex for this kind of stuff, it's a huge waste. Use the CPU intrinsics like the Interlocked* functions in the win32 api (and their equivalents in other compiler libraries).

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1  
The article Martin linked to is just plain wrong. The author is making a lot of assumptions about the underlying hardware. It is not necessarily true that a compiler can generate a "one liner" for a particular CPU. Even if it generates a one liner, it still might not be thread safe. The one liner might generate a fetch/increment/store cycle that would not be thread safe in a system with multiple CPUs/cores. – Jörgen Sigvardsson Feb 9 '11 at 21:42
    
The mutex references was just "pseudo code" for locking/releasing a win32 critical section (which is what I have in my production code). I think those are refered to as "spin locks". – Jörgen Sigvardsson Feb 9 '11 at 21:43
    
Still overkill, use the atomic instructions when possible. – Blindy Feb 9 '11 at 23:21

If you're on Windows, using Visual Studio, you could try with so-called intrinsics:

#include <intrin.h>
class C {
    int x;

public:
    C() : x(0) { }

    void Operation() {
        _InterlockedIncrement(&x);
    }
};

More on compiler intrinsics. Don't know about other OS, but I'm sure there are also intrinsics.

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