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I got question about the subprocess module of python.

I want to start a program which needs several minutes to complete. During this time i want to read the progress message of the program (which are printed on the stdout). The problem is that i can not find a possibility to read out its output during its run.

The only function i found to read out the output of a program is Popen.communicate(), but this function waits till the process finishes. So it is impossible to get the progress and make it visible to the user in a special formatted way.

I hope somebody knows a possiblity, maybe i overlook something? Or is it not possible?

Thanks in advance

PS: When i run the process with subprocess.popen with my script i see the output of the program on the screen. Is it possile to hide it? (Ubuntu 10.10, normal terminal)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Simplest is to call Popen with the keyword argument stdout=subprocess.PIPE.

p = subprocess.Popen(["ls"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
while True:
    line = p.stdout.readline()
    if not line:
        break
    print line

To see this in action, here are two sample scripts. Make them both in the same directory and run python superprint.py

printandwait.py:

import time
import sys
print 10
sys.stdout.flush()
time.sleep(10)
print 20
sys.stdout.flush()

superprint.py:

import subprocess
import sys
p = subprocess.Popen(["python printandwait.py"], shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
while True:
    print "Looping"
    line = p.stdout.readline()
    if not line:
        break
    print line.strip()
    sys.stdout.flush()
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What if some data arrives after you've broken the while loop? –  Neo Feb 9 '11 at 22:18
1  
@Neo: his example breaks at EOF, which means no more data can arrive after that. BUT, to answer the implication of your question: if you don't keep reading the stdout pipe, the buffer may fill and the subprocess will block attempting to write stdout. –  payne Feb 9 '11 at 22:26
    
It would be waiting for you in p.stdout to use later. However the readline call will block until new input arrives or the pipe closes. Added some example scripts. –  chmullig Feb 9 '11 at 22:30
1  
you could use for line in iter(p.stdout.readline, b''): print line, instead of the while-loop. –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 10 at 3:39

It's certainly possible: my package python-gnupg does exactly this, spawning gpg (Gnu Privacy Guard) under a subprocess. In the general case you need to specify subprocess.PIPE for the subprocess stdout and stderr; then create two separate threads which read the subprocess stdout and stderr to wherever you like.

In the case of python-gnupg, status messages from gpg are read and acted upon while the gpg process is running (not waiting until it's finished).

Basically, pseudocode is

process = subprocess.Popen(..., stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
stderr = process.stderr
rr = threading.Thread(target=response_reader_func, args=(process.stderr,))
rr.setDaemon(True)
rr.start()

dr = threading.Thread(target=data_reader_func, args=(process.stdout,))
dr.setDaemon(True)
dr.start()

dr.join()
rr.join()
process.wait()

The reader functions are typically methods of an enclosing class which do the right thing based on what they're reading (in your case, updating progress info in some way).

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You can do a poll on the status of your subprocess and keep outputting lines.

p = subprocess.Popen('ls;sleep 10', shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)

rc = p.poll()
while rc != 0:
    while True:
        line = p.stdout.readline()
        if not line:
            break
        print line
    rc = p.poll()

assert rc == 0
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