Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <list>

#ifdef __GNUC__
#include <ext/hash_map>
#else
#include <hash_map>
#endif

The compiler says " hash_map: No such file or directory " Need help. thank you.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

On MacOSX the correct header is at <ext/hash_map> not <hash_map>. Here worked fine:

#if defined __GNUC__ || defined __APPLE__
#include <ext/hash_map>
#else
#include <hash_map>
#endif

int main()
{
        using namespace __gnu_cxx;

        hash_map<int, int> map;
}

By the way, I prefer to use <tr1/unordered_map>.

share|improve this answer
    
I still got "‘hash_map’ was not declared in this scope" after followed your guide. –  Josh Morrison Feb 9 '11 at 22:29
    
Did you used using namespace __gnu_cxx; or __gnu_cxx::hash_map<int, int> ? –  Murilo Vasconcelos Feb 9 '11 at 22:32
    
thank you . solved. –  Josh Morrison Feb 9 '11 at 22:38
add comment

The <hash_map> header is not part of the C++ standard and is a compiler-specific implementation. There's no guarantee that you'll be able to find it on any particular system, or that the various implementations that arise on each system will be mutually compatible with one another.

If you want to use a hash map in C++, you might want to look into boost::unordered_map, tr1::unordered_map, or a prototype C++0x compiler's implementation of std::unordered_map. These implementations are fairly standardized, either by ISO or by the Boost community, and can easily be installed on most C++ compilers. I know that it's a bit presumptuous of me to just say "go rewrite this code using a different library," but given that C++ is about to gain hash containers of this form it's probably a worthwhile investment.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.