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I am writing this code to convert a hex entry into its integer equivalent. So A would be 10 and B would be 11 etc. This code acts weirdly, in that it seg. faults at random locations and including an extra newline character at times will get it to work. I am trying to debug it, just so I can understand what I am doing wrong here. Can anyone take a look and help me here ? Thanks a lot for your time.

/* Fixed working code for anyone interested */

         #include <stdio.h>
            #include <stdlib.h>


            unsigned int hextoint(const char temp[])
            {

            int i;
            int answer = 0;
            int dec;
            char hexchar[] = "aAbBcCdDeEfF" ;


            for ( i=0; temp[i] != '\0'; i++ )
            {

                if ( temp[i] == '\0')
                {

                    return ;        
                }

                if (temp[i] == '0' || temp[i] == 'x' || temp[i] == 'X' )
                {       
                    printf("0");
                    answer = temp[i];
                }

                // compare each temp[i] with all contents in hexchar[]
                int j;
                int a = temp[i];
                for ( j=0; hexchar[j] != '\0'; j++)
                {
                    if ( temp[i] == hexchar[j] )
                    {
                    answer *= 16;
                    answer = answer + 10 + (j/2);
  //                    printf("%d\n",answer );
                    break;      
                    }
                }

            }

            return answer;  

            }


            main()
            {
            char *test[] = 
            {   "bad",
                "aabbdd"
                "0100",
                "0x1",
                "0XA",
                "0X0C0BE",
                "abcdef",
                "123456",
                "0x123456",
                "deadbeef", 
                "zog_c"
            };

            int answer=0;

            // Calculate the number of char's.
            int numberOfChars;
            numberOfChars = sizeof test /sizeof test[0];

            printf("main():Number of chars = %d\n",numberOfChars);
            int i;
            // Go through each character and convert Hex to Integers.
            for ( i = 0; i<numberOfChars;i++)
            {
                // Need to take the first char and then go through it and convert            
                                        it.
                answer = hextoint(test[i]);
                printf("%d\n",answer ); 
            }


            }
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2  
Have you tried stepping through it one line at a time with a debugger, to see where the behaviour diverges from what you intended? –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 9 '11 at 23:17
    
If this is a function you need for something else (rather than just an exercise in writing a hex to int converter), take a look at the strtol function in the standard library. –  一二三 Feb 9 '11 at 23:22
    
sizeof(test) and sizeof(test[0]) have the same size. They're both pointers –  kisplit Feb 9 '11 at 23:27
    
Oli, I have. And gdb says that it crashes at for ( i=0; temp[i] != '\0'; i++ ) as the memory is out of bounds. But I am finding the behavior weird and am unable to figure out why the mem. is out of bounds. –  ZionKing Feb 9 '11 at 23:30
    
Phil, I am trying to debug this to better understand C and see where I am going wrong. I don't want to use the standard libraries. THanks –  ZionKing Feb 9 '11 at 23:32
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Let's take a look.

unsigned int hextoint(const char temp[])
{
    int i;
    int answer = 0;
    char hexchar[] = "aAbBcCdDeEfF" ;

    for ( i=0; temp[i] != '\0'; i++ )
    {
        printf("In here");
        printf("%c\t",temp[i] );
    }

    return answer;  
}

This doesn't seem to even try to do any conversion. It should always return 0, since answer is never assigned any other value. Normally, you'd do something like:

for (i=0; input[i] != '\0'; i++) {
    answer *= 16;
    answer += digit_value(input[i]);
}
return answer;

Where digit_value (obviously enough) returns the value of an individual digit. One way to do this is:

int digit_value(char input) { 
    input = tolower(input);
    if (input >= '0' && input <= '9')
        return input - '0';
    if (input >= 'a' && input <= 'f')
        return input - 'a' + 10;
    return -1; // signal error.
}

Then, looking at main:

main()
{

Depending on the "implicit int" rule is generally poor practice, at least IMO. It's much better to specify the return type.

// Calculate the number of char's.
int numberOfChars;
numberOfChars = sizeof test /sizeof test[0];

This actually calculates the number of strings, not the number of chars.

for ( i = 0; i<=numberOfChars;i++)

Valid subscripts run from 0 through the number of items - 1, so this attempts to read past the end of the array (giving undefined behavior).

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You also need to check for A to F. –  Peyman Feb 9 '11 at 23:46
    
@Peyman: Read the code a bit more carefully. If you give up, do a search for "tolower"... –  Jerry Coffin Feb 9 '11 at 23:47
    
Oh, my bad, didn't see that. –  Peyman Feb 9 '11 at 23:49
    
Thanks Everyone for your awesome help. The sizeof calculation was the issue as you guys pointed out. –  ZionKing Feb 10 '11 at 0:06
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The problem is with calculating numberOfChars part. sizeof test is actually the size of the pointer, not the total length of all characters in your array, so the number returned in your code would be 1, which makes the for loop go to the second index of test (test[1]) which does not have a \0 at the end. Try using strlen for calculating numberOfChars.

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1  
Since test is defined as an array of pointers, sizeof test yields the number of bytes in the array. sizeof(test[0]) yields the size of a single pointer in the array. Dividing gives the number of pointers. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 9 '11 at 23:53
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This'll work for any number within the unsigned int range, the nice thing is it does not use any other library functions so it is great for micro-controllers where space is tight.

unsigned int hexToInt(const char *hex)
  {
    unsigned int result = 0;

    while (*hex)
      {
        if (*hex > 47 && *hex < 58)
          result += (*hex - 48);
        else if (*hex > 64 && *hex < 71)
          result += (*hex - 55);
        else if (*hex > 96 && *hex < 103)
          result += (*hex - 87);

        if (*++hex)
          result <<= 4;
      }

    return result;
  }
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