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I am writing a shared library. The idea is as follows: Shared function inside the library will be called with either int or double parameter. It must accept both. At one point in the function there is a call to a "private" function that does something with the parameter depending on whether it is an int or double. I decided to use a template for the library function. If I understand it correctly the compiler needs to know the parameter's type otherwise it could not compile the library. I therefore instantiate two templates, one for int and one for double. The problem is that the compiler doesn't seem to know which version of the private function should be called, although it knows the type of its parameter.

It's late at night, I don't know what could be wrong with it, please help me :-)

Petr

library.hpp


#include < iostream >

namespace {

void printNumber(int const n);
void printNumber(double const n);

}

namespace library {

template < typename T >
void doSomething(T const number);

}

library.cpp


#include "library.hpp"

using namespace std;

void printNumber(int const n) {
    cout << "This was an int." << endl;
}

void printNumber(double const n) {
    cout << "This was a double." << endl;
}

template < typename T >
void library::doSomething(T const number) {
    // ...
    // Do something that does not depend on T at all...
    // ...
    printNumber(number);
}

template void library::doSomething(int const number);
template void library::doSomething(double const number);

Main.cpp


#include "library.hpp"

int main(int const argc, char const * (argv) []) {
    library::doSomething(10);
    library::doSomething(10.0);
    return 0;
}

Compiler


../src/library.cpp: In function ‘void library::doSomething(T) [with T = int]’:
../src/library.cpp:21:52:   instantiated from here
../src/library.cpp:18:2: error: call of overloaded ‘printNumber(const int&)’ is ambiguous
../src/library.cpp:5:6: note: candidates are: void printNumber(int)
../src/library.cpp:9:6: note:                 void printNumber(double)
/home/petmal/Eclipse_Projects/library/include/library.hpp:6:6: note:                 void::printNumber(double)
/home/petmal/Eclipse_Projects/library/include/library.hpp:5:6: note:                 void::printNumber(int)
../src/library.cpp: In function ‘void library::doSomething(T) [with T = double]’:
../src/library.cpp:22:55:   instantiated from here
../src/library.cpp:18:2: error: call of overloaded ‘printNumber(const double&)’ is ambiguous
../src/library.cpp:5:6: note: candidates are: void printNumber(int)
../src/library.cpp:9:6: note:                 void printNumber(double)
/home/petmal/Eclipse_Projects/library/include/library.hpp:6:6: note:                 void::printNumber(double)
/home/petmal/Eclipse_Projects/library/include/library.hpp:5:6: note:                 void::printNumber(int)
share|improve this question
    
declare printNumber(const int& n) as well. this is what the error message says. –  J-16 SDiZ Feb 10 '11 at 1:23
    
@J-16 SDiZ Does not make any difference... –  Petr Feb 10 '11 at 1:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your use of the anonymous namespace is incorrect. You're declaring printNumber() in an anonymous namespace, but then defining it in the global scope; this leads to ambiguity because you have two printNumber(int) and two printNumber(double) functions.

Try this:

library.hpp:

#ifndef LIBRARY
#define LIBRARY

namespace library {
    template < typename T >
    void doSomething(T const number);
}

#endif

library.cpp:

#include <iostream>

#include "library.hpp"

using namespace std;

namespace {
    void printNumber(int const n) {
        cout << "This was an int." << endl;
    }

    void printNumber(double const n) {
        cout << "This was a double." << endl;
    }
}

template < typename T >
void library::doSomething(T const number) {
    // ...
    // Do something that does not depend on T at all...
    // ...
    printNumber(number);
}

template void library::doSomething<int>(int const number);
template void library::doSomething<double>(double const number);

main.cpp: as in your example.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works. The other suggested method of moving definitions to the header file also does the job. Not sure which one is better... This one looks plausible... –  Petr Feb 10 '11 at 1:52
    
Yes. I don't know why the other answer was deleted -- I can easily believe that explicit template instantiation of this sort might not be a complete solution in some circumstances. Still, if it works on your target platform and you can be sure of only requiring a specific set of instantiations, then splitting the code out like this can certainly help reduce compile times, which is always nice. –  John Bartholomew Feb 10 '11 at 1:56

remove using namespace std; in the core code, declare which function of std you want to use, example :

int main() {
using std::cout;
using std::cin;
using std::endl;

//................. your code
}

and your program will run normally.

share|improve this answer

I believe that the ambiguity comes from the fact that "10" can be either an int or a double. Try casting it as one or the other and see if that fixes it.

share|improve this answer
    
It is the library itself that does not compile. Main.cpp is there for demonstration purposes only... –  Petr Feb 10 '11 at 1:28

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