Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having trouble understanding the difference between Array obj; and Array* obj = new Array; while overloading the array index operator []. When I have a pointer to the object, I get these error messages on VS 2010.

error C2679: binary '=' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'int' (or there is no acceptable conversion)
could be 'Array &Array::operator =(const Array &)' while trying to match the argument list '(Array, int)'

#include <iostream>
class Array
{
    int arr[10] ;

    public:
       int& operator[]( int index )
       {
           return arr[index] ;
       }
};

int main()
{
    //Array* obj = new Array; Error

    Array obj;   // Correct
    for( int i=0; i<10; ++i )
        obj[i] = i;

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

Can some one explain the rationale between the two kind of instances for operator overloading? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Similar: stackoverflow.com/questions/2808030/… –  coelhudo Feb 10 '11 at 2:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In case of Array *obj, obj[i] is the equivalent of *(obj+i), so it evaluates into an Array object.

You would have to do

int main()
{
    Array* obj = new Array;

    for( int i=0; i<10; ++i )
        (*obj)[i] = i;

    getchar();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
"so it evaluates into an Array object" is a very strange and vague claim. I'd say it assumes obj is first in a contiguous array of Arrays, and moves to the (i+1)th (array indexing being 0 based). What then happens is that it tries to assign i directly into that the Array object at that address, and there's no Array::operator=(int) nor Array(int) constructor so that's not possible. Just as well ;-), as a silent error like that would create undefined run-time behaviour and be harder to notice and fix. –  Tony D Feb 10 '11 at 2:53

You defined operator[] for Array, not for Array*. In the commented-out code, you create an Array*. In fact, you cannot overload an operator for any pointer type. Applying [] to a pointer treats it as an array, converting the array indexing into pointer arithmetic. Thus, applying [] to an Array* yields an Array (really an Array&). You can't assign an int to an Array because you didn't define that (and don't want to, either).

Modern, well-written C++ uses the keyword new very seldom. You should not be suspicious that your C++ code doesn't contain the keyword new. You should be suspicious every time it does!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.