Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code containing a template function. When I am calling this function with second parameter being an enum: in some cases it finds the template specialization and in some cases it does not.

I had verified that enums are the same enums in both cases (e.g there are no redefinitions) and that other parameters have correct values, I found that one compilation is done with -Winline set (I did not try changing it yet) what else to look at?

class A {
public:
    template <typename T>
    int f(uint32_t id, T const& t, bool cond);

    ...
};

template <typename T>
int A::f(uint32_t id, T const& t, bool cond)
{
   ...
}

template <>
inline int A::f<int>(uint32_t, int const& t, bool cond)
{
   ....
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you allowed to specialize a function template outside its class without declaring the specialization within the class? –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 10 '11 at 2:58
    
@Jeremiah Willcock- Yes, this is legal. You are only allowed to fully specialize it, though. I have no idea why the standards committee decided to make this legal. –  templatetypedef Feb 10 '11 at 3:04
    
@templatetypedef: that is really odd. Did you undo the fixes I put into the code (the signature to the specialization, in particular)? –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 10 '11 at 3:13
    
@Jeremiah Willcock- If I did it wasn't intentional. Did you have any fixes other than the ::? –  templatetypedef Feb 10 '11 at 3:15
    
A:f<int> -> A::f<int> and boo -> bool are the two I saw. –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 10 '11 at 3:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For starters, typically, it's inadvisable to use template specialization as a way of overloading a template function. Template specializations interact poorly with function overloading and have some pretty arcane rules dictating when they're chosen, and in general it's considered better to just provide a regular function overload than to specialize a function template.

In this case, I'd advise changing your class to look like this:

class A {
public:
    template <typename T>
        int f(uint32_t id, T const& t, bool cond);
    int f(uint32_t id, int t, bool cond);
    ...
};

Then changing your template specialization to just be an implementation of the overload. Due to the way that C++ function overloading works, this will select the correct version of the function more accurately.

As for your particular question, the reason that your code isn't always calling the overload is that C++ makes a distinction between an enumerated type and the type int. Though there are ways of converting between ints and enumerated types, they aren't the same thing, and an overload designed to catch ints is not guaranteed to catch enumerated types as well. You are probably better off specifically overloading the function to handle the enumerated case.

share|improve this answer
    
Great that you've an alternative/workaround, but the rationale for recommending it is basically FUD. –  Tony D Feb 10 '11 at 3:47
    
+1 I agree, mixing integers and enums in overloads and/or specializations is tricky to say the least. In my book, that's labelled with the evil words: "undefined behaviour". –  Mikael Persson Feb 10 '11 at 3:49
    
@Mikael: there's a big difference between saying "hey, the Standard says this is Undefined Behaviour - don't do it", and "yikes - this is just too trivial, you can't trust the current generation - or this particular - compiler to follow the Standard". Would be nice to know which category we're talking about, or if there's simply some other flaw in the failing code (the code I've posted didn't reproduce the problem under GCC). –  Tony D Feb 10 '11 at 4:01
1  
@Tony- The reason to avoid function template specialization is that it interacts poorly with overloading and can lead to completely counterintuitive results. See gotw.ca/publications/mill17.htm for some more rationale. Thanks for pointing out that I was being vague; hopefully this is a more useful explanation. And @Mikael Persson- it's not undefined behavior; it's just weird. :-) –  templatetypedef Feb 10 '11 at 4:06
    
Man, don't you guys know the meaning of "in my book", it's an expression, it means "in my opinion"... geez.. I wasn't referring to an actual book! And definitely not the C++ standard! –  Mikael Persson Feb 10 '11 at 4:30

Not an attempted answer, but want to post more than will fit in a comment...

Basically, this shows expected behaviour (enums never matching int specialisation) for GCC 3.4.6. What compiler are you using? Can you actually provide a similar, complete program that produces the error?

#include <iostream>                                                             

struct A                                                                        
{                                                                               
  public:                                                                       
    template <typename T>                                                       
    void f(const T&) { std::cout << "general\n"; }                              
};                                                                              

template <>                                                                     
void A::f<int>(const int&) { std::cout << "specialised\n"; }                    

enum E1 { Zero, One, Two };                                                     

enum E2 { Max = INT_MAX };                                                      

int main()                                                                      
{                                                                               
    A a;                                                                        
    a.f("abc");                                                                 
    a.f(123);                                                                   
    a.f(Zero);                                                                  
    E1 e = Two;                                                                 
    a.f(e);                                                                     
    a.f(Max);                                                                   
}

Output:

general
specialised
general
general
general
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.