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How come this approach of creating a private class method works:

class Person

  def self.get_name
    persons_name
  end

  class << self
    private
      def persons_name
        "Sam"
      end
  end
end

puts "Hey, " + Person.get_name
puts "Hey, " + Person.persons_name  #=> raises "private method `persons_name' called for Person:Class (NoMethodError)"

but this does not

class Person

  def self.get_name
    persons_name
  end

  private
    def self.persons_name
      "Sam"
    end
end

puts "Hey, " + Person.get_name
puts "Hey, " + Person.persons_name
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

private doesn't seem to work if you are defining a method on an explicit object (in your case self). You can use private_class_method to define class methods as private (or like you described).

class Person

  def self.get_name
    persons_name
  end

  def self.persons_name
    "Sam"
  end
  private_class_method :persons_name
end

puts "Hey, " + Person.get_name
puts "Hey, " + Person.persons_name
share|improve this answer

ExiRe wrote:

Such behavior of ruby is really frustrating. I mean if you move to private section self.method then it is NOT private. But if you move it to class << self then it suddenly works. It is just disgusting.

Confusing it probably is, frustrating it may well be, but disgusting it is definitely not.

It makes perfect sense once you understand Ruby's object model and the corresponding method lookup flow, especially when taking into consideration that private is NOT an access/visibility modifier, but actually a method call (with the class as its recipient) as discussed here... there's no such thing as "a private section" in Ruby.

To define private instance methods, you call private on the instance's class to set the default visibility for subsequently defined methods to private... and hence it makes perfect sense to define private class methods by calling private on the class's class, ie. its metaclass.

Other mainstream, self-proclaimed OO languages may give you a less confusing syntax, but you definitely trade that off against a confusing and less consistent (inconsistent?) object model without the power of Ruby's metaprogramming facilities.

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So if I understand correctly, ruby itself has no access modifier keywords(public, private, and protected) but rather has access modifier methods(public,private,protected)? Is this something that should be brought up on the ruby bug tracker for Matz to implement proper keyword access modifiers or is this expected behaviour? –  Edward Mar 21 '13 at 16:00
3  
@Edward It's designed that way junichiito.blogspot.co.uk/2012/03/…. Why "proper" ? –  iain Apr 3 '13 at 11:58

By default all class methods are public. To make private you can use Module#private_class_method like @tjwallace wrote or define differently as you did

class << self

private
  def method_name
    ....
  end
end

class << self opens up self's singleton class, so that methods can be redefined for the current self object. This is used to define class/module ("static") method. Defining private method over there only gives you private class method.

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1  
since they already had the answer - best just to focus on a concise answer / feedback to the question. –  New Alexandria Sep 25 '12 at 18:50

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