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You find plenty of tutorials on menu bars in HTML, but for this specific (though IMHO generic) case, I haven't found any decent solution:

#  THE MENU ITEMS    SHOULD BE    JUSTIFIED     JUST AS    PLAIN TEXT     WOULD BE  #
#  ^                                                                             ^  #
  • There's an varying number of text-only menu items and the page layout is fluid.
  • The first menu item should be left-aligned, the last menu item should be right-aligned.
  • The remaining items should be spread optimally on the menu bar.
  • The number is varying,so there's no chance to pre-calculate the optimal widths.

Note that a TABLE won't work here as well:

  • If you center all TDs, the first and the last item aren’t aligned correctly.
  • If you left-align and right-align the first resp. the last items, the spacing will be sub-optimal.

Isn’t it strange that there is no obvious way to implement this in a clean way by using HTML and CSS?

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3  
Have you found a solution other than any of the ones provided here? If you have, I think all participants would love to know what solution you've implemented. If not, it would be nice if you could mark one of the provided solutions as an answer or comment on either of them to point out what they're missing to become a good solution for you. :) –  asbjornu Apr 29 '10 at 22:02

13 Answers 13

The simplest thing to do is to is to force the line to break by inserting an element at the end of the line that will occupy more than the left available space and then hiding it. I've accomplished this quite easily with a simple span element like so:

<div id="menu">
  <ul>
    <li><a href="#">Menu item 1</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Menu item 3</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Menu item 2</a></li>
  </ul>

  <span></span>
</div>

The accompanying CSS is quite simple:

#menu {
  text-align: justify;
}

#menu * {
  display: inline;
}

#menu li {
  display: inline-block;
}

#menu span {
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
  width: 100%;
  height: 0;
}

All the junk inside the #menu span selector is (as far as I've found) required to please most browsers. It should force the width of the span element to 100%, which should cause a line break since it is considered an inline element due to the display: inline-block rule. inline-block also makes the span possible to block-level style rules like width which causes the element to not fit in line with the menu and thus the menu to line-break.

You of course need to adjust the width of the span to your use case and design, but I hope you get the general idea and can adapt it.

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1  
It seems to work if you use a span instead of an hr! It's not really working, the HR is occupying visible space - use #menu { border: solid 1px green; } to confirm. Also, display: inline-block; does not work on IE (...7? CompatibilityView?) for elements that aren't naturally inline elements. HR is a block element, so I'm guessing inline-block doesn't work for HR on IE. Anyway, span. –  ANeves Apr 7 '10 at 11:30
8  
works great, but results are prettier if you replace each space with &ensp; (n space), so that Menu & item & 1 stay close together. &nbsp; doesn't work in safari. –  yitwail Aug 9 '11 at 19:39
9  
I just spent over an hour beating my head against the wall, trying to figure out why this wasn't working for me. The answer is that I needed white space between the tags. I am working in WordPress, and wp_page_menu does not include line breaks after each <li></li>. Added them using preg_replace, and it works now. Fwewww –  Greg Perham May 30 '12 at 5:43
1  
To get this to work these days you have to use display: inline-block on the LIs in browsers that support it, and use display: inline with spaces replaced by &nbsp; on browsers that don't support it. Also since ie7 doesn't support inline-block, you have to use inline on your force-wrap tag and just shove enough &nbsp;s in it to force the wrap. –  Joren Aug 8 '12 at 20:22
1  
To clarify Joren's comment, the UL still needs to be inline and the LI's inline-block. –  Moss Sep 4 '13 at 2:55

Got a solution. Works in FF, IE6, IE7, Webkit, etc.

Make sure you don't put any whitespace before closing the span.inner. IE6 will break.

HTML:

<div class="outer">
<span class="inner">THE MENU ITEMS</span>
<span class="inner">SHOULD BE</span>
<span class="inner">JUSTIFIED</span>
<span class="inner">JUST AS</span>
<span class="inner">PLAIN TEXT</span>
<span class="inner">WOULD BE</span>
<span class="finish"></span>
</div>

CSS (you can optionally give .outer a width):

.outer {text-align: justify}
.outer span.finish {display: inline-block; width: 100%}
.outer span.inner {display: inline-block; white-space: nowrap}
share|improve this answer
    
For me, this solution works fine with Gecko, but not with WebKit browsers (tested with Chromium, Midori, Epiphany): With WebKit, there's trailing space after the last item. –  flight Apr 7 '10 at 10:55
    
Make sure there's only one character of whitespace between each span, and two between the last inner and the finish. If that doesn't work fiddle around with the whitespace. There is a bug in webkit. –  mikelikespie Apr 7 '10 at 22:50
1  
.outer {text-align: justify} .outer span.finish {display: inline-block; width: 100%} .outer span.inner {display: inline-block; white-space: nowrap} Does not work on IE6 and IE7. –  Binyamin Jul 5 '10 at 12:00
    
Giving the .outer line-height: 0 forces the list's height to be rendered as if it were consisting of one line. –  kontur Mar 14 at 10:40

Ok, this solution doesn't work on IE6/7, because of the lack of support of :before/:after, but:

the html :

<div id="menu">
  <ul>
    <li><a href="#">Menu item 1</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Menu item 2</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Menu item 3</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Menu item 4</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Menu item 5</a></li>
  </ul>
</div>

the css :

ul{
    text-align:justify;
    list-style: none; list-style-image: none; margin: 0; padding: 0;
}
ul:after{content:""; margin-left:100%;}
li{display:inline;}
a{display:inline-block;}

The reason why I have the a tag as an inline-block is because I don't want the words inside to be justified as well, and I don't want to use non-breaking spaces either.

share|improve this answer

Works with Opera , Firefox, Chrome and IE

ul {
   display: table;
   margin: 1em auto 0;
   padding: 0;
   text-align: center;
   width: 90%;
}

li {
   display: table-cell;
   border: 1px solid black;
   padding: 0 5px;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Unfortunately this does not work in IE 7 because of the missing table-cell support –  Philipp Mikael Jan 22 '13 at 16:32

Make it a <p> with text-align: justify ?

Update: Nevermind. That doesn't work at all as I'd thought.

Update 2: Doesn't work in any browsers other than IE right now, but CSS3 has support for this in the form of text-align-last

share|improve this answer
    
That was fast! I thought my own solution was unique, but you came up with something similar to start with in just a few moments. –  flight Sep 8 '08 at 12:22

For Gecko-based browsers, I came up with this solution. This solution doesn't work with WebKit browsers, though (e.g. Chromium, Midori, Epiphany), they still show trailing space after the last item.

I put the menu bar in a justified paragraph. Problem is that the last line of a justified paragraph won't be rendered justified, for obvious reasons. Therefore I add a wide invisible element (e.g. an img) which warrants that the paragraph is at least two lines long.

Now the menu bar is justified by the same algorithm the browser uses for justifying plain text.

Code:

<div style="width:500px; background:#eee;">
 <p style="text-align:justify">
  <a href="#">THE&nbsp;MENU&nbsp;ITEMS</a>
  <a href="#">SHOULD&nbsp;BE</a>
  <a href="#">JUSTIFIED</a>
  <a href="#">JUST&nbsp;AS</a>
  <a href="#">PLAIN&nbsp;TEXT</a>
  <a href="#">WOULD&nbsp;BE</a>
  <img src="/Content/Img/stackoverflow-logo-250.png" width="400" height="0"/>
 </p>
 <p>There's an varying number of text-only menu items and the page layout is fluid.</p>
 <p>The first menu item should be left-aligned, the last menu item should be right-aligned. The remaining items should be spread optimal on the menu bar.</p>
 <p>The number is varying,so there's no chance to pre-calculate the optimal widths.</p>
 <p>Note that a TABLE won't work here as well:</p>
 <ul>
  <li>If you center all TDs, the first and the last item aren't aligned correctly.</li>
  <li>If you left-align and right-align the first resp. the last items, the spacing will be sub-optimal.</li>
 </ul>
</div>

Remark: Do you notice I cheated? To add the space filler element, I have to make some guess about the width of the menu bar. So this solution is not completely down to the rules.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that you could have used a list here as well, if you set display:inline on the list-items... lists are more conventional for menus. –  Andrew Vit Feb 17 '09 at 10:12
    
@Andrew Vit: You're right. That's mostly what asbjornu's solution suggests as well. –  flight Apr 7 '10 at 11:03
    
@flight, if you think my answer is a solution can you please mark it as one? Right now it looks like your problem is unsolved. If it isn't, it would be nice if you provided us with the solution you've found or mark any of the provided answers as the solution to your problem. :-) –  asbjornu Sep 26 '11 at 20:21

Text is only justified if the sentence naturally causes a line break. So all you need to do is naturally force a line break, and hide whats on the second line:

    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html lang="en">
        <head>
            <meta charset="utf-8" />
            <title></title>
            <style type="text/css">
            ul {
                text-align:justify;
                width:400px;
                margin:0;
                padding:0;
                height:1.2em;         /* forces the height of the ul to one line */
                overflow:hidden;      /* enforces the single line height */
                list-style-type:none;
                background-color:yellow;
            }

            ul li {
                display:inline;
            }

            ul li.break {
                margin-left:100%;  /* use e.g. 1000px if your ul has no width */
            }
            </style>
        </head>
        <body>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="/">The</a></li>
                <li><a href="/">quick</a></li>
                <li><a href="/">brown</a></li>
                <li><a href="/">fox</a></li> <li class="break">&nbsp;</li>
            </ul>
        </body>
    </html>

The li.break element must be on the same line as the last menu item and must contain some content (in this case a non breaking space), otherwise in some browsers, if it's not on the same line then you'll see some small extra space on the end of your line, and if it contains no content then it's ignored and the line is not justified.

Tested in IE7, IE8, IE9, Chrome, Firefox 4.

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yet another solution. I had no option to tackle the html like adding distinguished class etc., so I found a pure css way.

Works in Chrome, Firefox, Safari..don't know about IE.

Test: http://jsfiddle.net/c2crP/1

HTML:

<ul>
  <li>
    <a href="#">home</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a href="#">exposities</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a href="#">werk</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a href="#">statement</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a href="#">contact</a>
  </li>
</ul>

CSS:

ul {
   margin: 0; 
   padding: 0; 
   list-style: none; 
   width: 200px; 
   text-align: justify; 
   list-style-type: none;
}
ul > li {
   display: inline; 
   text-align:justify; 
}
// declaration below will add a whitespace after every li. This is for one line codes where no whitespace (of breaks) are present and the browser wouldn't know where to make a break. 
ul > li:after {
   content:' '; 
   display:inline;
}
ul > li:last-child:after {
   display:inline-block; // notice the 'inline-block'! Otherwise won't work for webkit which puts after pseudo el inside of it's parent instead of after thus shifting also the parent on next line!
   margin-left:100%; 
   content:' ' 
}
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Isn’t it strange that there is no obvious way to implement this in a clean way by using HTML and CSS?

Maybe, but are there any other layout languages that make this easy to implement? It might be harder than it looks.

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if to go with javascript that is possible (this script is base on mootools)

<script type="text/javascript">//<![CDATA[
    window.addEvent('load', function(){
        var mncontainer = $('main-menu');
        var mncw = mncontainer.getSize().size.x;
        var mnul = mncontainer.getFirst();//UL
        var mnuw = mnul.getSize().size.x;
        var wdif = mncw - mnuw;
        var list = mnul.getChildren(); //get all list items
        //get the remained width (which can be positive or negative)
        //and devided by number of list item and also take out the precision
        var liwd = Math.floor(wdif/list.length);
        var selw, mwd=mncw, tliw=0;
        list.each(function(el){
            var elw = el.getSize().size.x;
            if(elw < mwd){ mwd = elw; selw = el;}
            el.setStyle('width', elw+liwd);
            tliw += el.getSize().size.x;
        });
        var rwidth = mncw-tliw;//get the remain width and set it to item which has smallest width
        if(rwidth>0){
            elw = selw.getSize().size.x;
            selw.setStyle('width', elw+rwidth);
        }
    });
    //]]>
</script>

and the css

<style type="text/css">
    #main-menu{
        padding-top:41px;
        width:100%;
        overflow:hidden;
        position:relative;
    }
    ul.menu_tab{
        padding-top:1px;
        height:38px;
        clear:left;
        float:left;
        list-style:none;
        margin:0;
        padding:0;
        position:relative;
        left:50%;
        text-align:center;
    }
    ul.menu_tab li{
        display:block;
        float:left;
        list-style:none;
        margin:0;
        padding:0;
        position:relative;
        right:50%;
    }
    ul.menu_tab li.item7{
        margin-right:0;
    }
    ul.menu_tab li a, ul.menu_tab li a:visited{
        display:block;
        color:#006A71;
        font-weight:700;
        text-decoration:none;
        padding:0 0 0 10px;
    }
    ul.menu_tab li a span{
        display:block;
        padding:12px 10px 8px 0;
    }
    ul.menu_tab li.active a, ul.menu_tab li a:hover{
        background:url("../images/bg-menutab.gif") repeat-x left top;
        color:#999999;
    }
    ul.menu_tab li.active a span,ul.menu_tab li.active a.visited span, ul.menu_tab li a:hover span{
        background:url("../images/bg-menutab.gif") repeat-x right top;
        color:#999999;
    }
</style>

and the last html

<div id="main-menu">
    <ul class="menu_tab">
        <li class="item1"><a href="#"><span>Home</span></a></li>
        <li class="item2"><a href="#"><span>The Project</span></a></li>
        <li class="item3"><a href="#"><span>About Grants</span></a></li>
        <li class="item4"><a href="#"><span>Partners</span></a></li>
        <li class="item5"><a href="#"><span>Resources</span></a></li>
        <li class="item6"><a href="#"><span>News</span></a></li>
        <li class="item7"><a href="#"><span>Contact</span></a></li>
    </ul>
</div>
share|improve this answer

Simpler markup, tested in Opera, FF, Chrome, IE7, IE8:

<div class="nav">
  <a href="#" class="nav_item">nav item1</a>
  <a href="#" class="nav_item">nav item2</a>
  <a href="#" class="nav_item">nav item3</a>
  <a href="#" class="nav_item">nav item4</a>
  <a href="#" class="nav_item">nav item5</a>
  <a href="#" class="nav_item">nav item6</a>
  <span class="empty"></span>
</div>

and css:

.nav { width:500px; height:1em; line-height:1em; text-align:justify; overflow:hidden; border:1px dotted gray;}
.nav_item { display:inline-block; }
.empty { display:inline-block; width:100%; height:0;}

Live example.

share|improve this answer
    
-1. Example is for 404. –  BasTaller Sep 25 '13 at 23:25

This can be achieved perfectly by some careful measurements and the last-child selector.

ul li {
margin-right:20px;
}
ul li:last-child {
margin-right:0;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Keep in mind text doesn't render the same everywhere, a pixel off and you'd see a broken menu. This would only work with fixed-width element like images. –  bfred.it Oct 17 '11 at 1:12

I know the original question specified HTML + CSS, but it didn't specifically say no javascript ;)

Trying to keep the css and markup as clean as possible, and as semantically meaningful as possible to (using a UL for the menu) I came up with this suggestion. Probably not ideal, but it may be a good starting point:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">

<html>

    <head>
    	<title>Kind-of-justified horizontal menu</title>

    	<style type="text/css">
    	ul {
    		list-style: none;
    		margin: 0;
    		padding: 0;
    		width: 100%;
    	}

    	ul li {
    		display: block;
    		float: left;
    		text-align: center;
    	}
    	</style>

    	<script type="text/javascript">
    		setMenu = function() {
    			var items = document.getElementById("nav").getElementsByTagName("li");
    			var newwidth = 100 / items.length;

    			for(var i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
    				items[i].style.width = newwidth + "%";
    			}
    		}
    	</script>

    </head>

    <body>

    	<ul id="nav">
    		<li><a href="#">first item</a></li>
    		<li><a href="#">item</a></li>
    		<li><a href="#">item</a></li>
    		<li><a href="#">item</a></li>
    	<li><a href="#">item</a></li>
    		<li><a href="#">last item</a></li>
    	</ul>

    	<script type="text/javascript">
    		setMenu();
    	</script>

    </body>

</html>
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