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I'm new to python, so please excuse what is probably a pretty dumb question.

Basically, I have a single global variable, called _debug, which is used to determine whether or not the script should output debugging information. My problem is, I can't set it in a different python script than the one that uses it.

I have two scripts:

one.py:
-------

def my_function():
  if _debug:
    print "debugging!"


two.py:
-------

from one import *
_debug = False

my_function()

Running two.py generates an error:

NameError: global name '_debug' is not defined

Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

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4 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

There are more problems than just the leading underscore I'm afraid.

When you call my_function(), it still won't have your debug variable in its namespace, unless you import it from two.py.

Of course, doing that means you'll end up with cyclic dependencies (one.py -> two.py -> one.py), and you'll get NameErrors unless you refactor where various things are imported and declared.

One solution would be to create a simple third module which defines 'constants' like this, which can be safely imported from anywhere, e.g.:

constants.py
------------
debug = True

one.py
------
from constants import debug
#...

two.py
------
from constants import debug
#...

However, I would recommend just using the built in logging module for this - why not? It's easy to configure, simpler to use, reliable, flexible and extensible.

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Yes, the logging module is the way to go here. –  unbeknown Jan 30 '09 at 14:09
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Names beginning with an underscore aren't imported with

from one import *
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1  
And it is because they mean "this is internal stuff, do not touch it, or do so at your own risk". –  Bartosz Radaczyński Jan 30 '09 at 14:00
    
I'm actually shocked that a completely incorrect answer has been accepted and voted up so highly. –  James Brady Jan 30 '09 at 14:02
    
Well it's not completely incorrect; kgiannakakis is correct about names beginning with underscores not being imported. However, you're correct that this still isn't why his example code doesn't work. Your answer is much better. –  Eli Courtwright Jan 30 '09 at 14:21
    
yeah, that does not solve the issue –  nosklo Jan 30 '09 at 17:04
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You can also use the __debug__ variable for debugging. It is true if the interpreter wasn't started with the -O option. The assert statement might be helpful, too.

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A bit more explanation: The function my_function's namespace is always in the module one. This means that when the name _debug is not found in my_function, it looks in one, not the namespace from which the function is called. Alabaster's answer provides a good solution.

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