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Is there a way for jQuery to detect that more than one key was pressed at the same time?

Is there any alternative that allows for pressing two keys at the same time to be detected?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 43 down vote accepted

In order to detect multiple keys being held down, use the keydown and keyup events.

var keys = {};

$(document).keydown(function (e) {
    keys[e.which] = true;
});

$(document).keyup(function (e) {
    delete keys[e.which];
});

I've put together a demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/gFcuU/. It's kind of fun, though I noticed my keyboard is only able to detect at most 6 keys.

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Nice script, I was able to get only 6 keys at the same time max when their char codes were far apart (2 or more difference). ps. why delete the key and not set it just to false? –  jerone Feb 10 '11 at 7:46
    
@jerone I guess I didn't want the object to clutter up with a history of all the keys, and it'll save a few iterations in the printKeys loop. But in practice, you're right, it's a small difference. –  Box9 Feb 10 '11 at 7:51
    
I can also do around 7 keys, however for what I want (arrows keys) there are some combinations that either allows 3 or 2, but never 4... interesting –  ajax333221 May 20 '12 at 4:45
    
@ajax333221 this is usually a hardware problem - due to how your keyboard is wired up. Different keyboards will behave differently. –  Box9 May 26 '12 at 10:43
1  
See: jsfiddle.net/gFcuU/524 - try to CTRL + C some text. Afterwards, the "keys down" will stay at 1, until you press/release CTRL and C, seperately. How can we avoid this? –  Mattias Nov 10 '13 at 16:30

It depends. For "normal" keys, that means Non- Shift, Ctrl, ALT, (CMD), the answer is no, the event handler will catch/fire in a queue, one after another.

For the modifier keys I mentioned above, there is a property on the event object.

Example:

$(document).bind('keypress', function(event) {
    if( event.which === 65 && event.shiftKey ) {
        alert('you pressed SHIFT+A');
    }
});

Demo: http://www.jsfiddle.net/bM6uY/4/

Other propertys are:

  • event.ctrlKey
  • event.altKey
  • event.metaKey
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@jAndy What is event.metaKey for? –  Jacob Relkin Feb 10 '11 at 7:30
1  
for practical reasons it's the windows/command key (but.. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meta_key) –  Mauricio Feb 10 '11 at 7:34
    
@Jacob, I'm guessing the windows/mac key? From w3: "On some platforms this key may map to an alternative key name." –  Box9 Feb 10 '11 at 7:35
    
@Box9: nope, on my Mac here, metaKey is set to true for alt, shift, ctrl and cmd. Its worth to notice that keypress won't fire for CMD. But for keydown e.g. –  jAndy Feb 10 '11 at 7:42
    
Actually that's odd, metaKey is only true for the Cmd on my mac in Chrome. –  Box9 Feb 10 '11 at 7:56

Nope. keypress will fire for every individual key that is pressed - except for modifier keys such as CTRL, ALT and SHIFT, you can combine them with other keys, so long as it is only one other key.

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You can use my plugin for jquery to detect shortcuts.

It basically cache's events and get what keys are pressed at the moment. If all the keys are pressed it fires function.

https://github.com/maciekpaprocki/bindShortcut

You have small explanation how to use it in readme file. Hope this helps. Feedback more than appreciated.

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