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So I have two threads going - a Server thread and a Client thread. I can get the server to write, but it never gets read by the client. Here is the client, server, and the thread spawned by the server to handle the client connection.

Client - connect to the socket and try to ping-pong with the server. The client expects the server to talk to it first!

public class ClientMain {    
    public static void main(String[] args) throws UnknownHostException, IOException {
        Socket socket = new Socket("localhost", 14285);

        BufferedReader in = null;
        PrintWriter out = null;
        try {
            in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(socket.getInputStream()));
            out = new PrintWriter(socket.getOutputStream());
        } catch(IOException e) {
            Log.write("Error in client thread ");
            Log.write(e);
        }
        while(true) {
        System.out.println("About to read!! :-D");
            String fromServer = in.readLine();
            System.out.println("From server: " + fromServer);
            out.println("PONG");
        }
    }
}

Server - this is the start method of the server. It spawns a thread for watching the serverSocket, and spawning client threads as necessary. Yes I realize it's sort of a bad practice to define a class inside a method like that... and my apologies if it's hard to read.

public void start() {
    this.running = true;
    // probably could have done this better, but it gets the job done
    class Start implements Runnable {
        Server server;
        Start(Server server) { this.server = server; }
        public void run() {
            while(server.running) {
                try {
                    Socket socket = server.serverSocket.accept();
                    Log.write("Accepted socket");
                    new ClientThread(server,socket).start();
                } catch (IOException e) { e.printStackTrace(); }
            }
        }

    }
    Thread start = new Thread(new Start(this));
    start.start();
}

Here's the client thread - this isn't all that much either. I get my streams from the socket, and write some data until I don't have anymore, then get some data from the client.

        public void run() {
            Log.write("Running clientthread");
            BufferedReader in = null;
            PrintWriter out = null;
            try {
                in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(socket.getInputStream()));
                out = new PrintWriter(socket.getOutputStream());

            } catch(IOException e) {
                running = false;
                Log.write("Error in client thread " + getName());
                Log.write(e);
            }
            while(running) {

                try {
                    String message = messageQueue.poll();
                    while(message != null) {
                        out.println(message);
                        Log.write("wrote message: " + message);
                        message = messageQueue.poll();
                    }
                    String input = in.readLine();
                    System.out.println("From client: " + input);
                    server.handle(username,input,this);
                }
                catch(IOException e) {
                    Log.write("Error in client thread " + getName() + " username=" + username);
                    Log.write(e);
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

Now here's what I'm getting for an output on the server side:

Accepted socket
Running clientthread
wrote message: PING

This indicates to me that it's getting the connection and writing the message out. (For clarity, a PING gets populated in the messageQueue when the client thread is instantiated, that way there's always something to say to the client to get the conversation started. It's like an icebreaker for shy threads, eh?) It also indicates to me that it is getting nothing from the client back, because nothing prints after the in.readLine()

Also, the only output on the client is the notification that it's about to read. So how can it be missing what the server is writing?

Any ideas are appreciated!

Thanks!!

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@jgauffin - thanks for the tags :) probably should have thought of those! –  corsiKa Feb 10 '11 at 8:19
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I am guessing, try to add:

out.flush();
out.close();
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1  
Doh! It's obviously too late for me to be doing this. I didn't close() because, well, I don't want to close the connection. But I DO want to flush it. I will need to add some logic in to make sure the buffer doesn't overflow before I flush, or that I flush too often... but that is what I needed. Thank you! –  corsiKa Feb 10 '11 at 8:28
    
YOUR WELCOME! Thanks you for my first accepted answer! –  Rinat Tainov Feb 10 '11 at 8:32
    
I added autoflush to my PrintWriters and it's working smoothly. At the very least, it will allow me to move forward with prototype development. If I encounter a performance/bandwidth issue later, I can address it then. Thanks again. –  corsiKa Feb 10 '11 at 8:36
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Add an out.flush(); everytime you want to send a message. DO NOT CLOSE the stream until you are done with it. add an out.close(); only when you are done with the stream.

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