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I want to run a JavaScript code to ping 4 different IP addresses and then retrieve the packet loss and latency of these ping requests and display them on the page.

How do I do this?

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Related to this question. –  Linus Kleen Feb 10 '11 at 8:18
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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can't do this from JS. What you could do is this:

 client --AJAX-- yourserver --ICMP ping-- targetservers

Make an AJAX request to your server, which will then ping the target servers for you, and return the result in the AJAX result.

Possible caveats:

  • this tells you whether the target servers are pingable from your server, not from the user's client
    • so the client won't be able to test hosts its LAN
    • but you shouldn't let the host to check hosts on the server's internal network, if any
    • some hosts may block traffic from certain hosts and not others
  • you need to limit the ping count per machine:
    • to avoid the AJAX request from timing out
    • some site operators can get very upset when you keep pinging their sites all the time
  • resources
    • long-running HTTP requests could run into maximum connection limit of your server, check how high it is
    • many users trying to ping at once might generate suspicious-looking traffic (all ICMP and nothing else)
  • concurrency - you may wish to pool/cache the up/down status for a few seconds at least, so that multiple clients wishing to ping the same target won't launch a flood of pings
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The only method I can think of is loading e.g. an image file from the external server. When that load fails, you "know" the server isn't responding (you actually don't know, because the server could just be blocking you).

Take a look at this example code to see what I mean:

 /*note that this is not an ICMP ping - but a simple HTTP request
    giving you an idea what you could do . In this simple implementation it has flaws
    as Piskvor correctly points out below */
    function ping(extServer){
     var ImageObject = new Image();
     ImageObject.src = "http://"+extServer+"/URL/to-a-known-image.jpg"; //e.g. logo -- mind the caching, maybe use a dynamic querystring
     if(ImageObject.height>0){
       alert("Ping worked!");
     } else {
       alert("Ping failed :(");
     }

}
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2  
That's not ping, that's an HTTP request (therefore TCP/IP). Also, if the target doesn't run an HTTP server, the request will take a loooong time to time out; plus, the loading is asynchronous - unless the image is already in cache, ImageObject.height will return 0 if you check it right after setting the src; and if it is in cache, it will return "Ping worked", whether the target is up or not. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ping –  Piskvor Feb 10 '11 at 8:34
    
Relax Piskvor - you are perfectly correct that this is not a REAL ping (neither is your solution) - you would need to be able to open sockets and send arbitrary TCP/IP packets to simulate a ping - I just called the method ping for simplicity. You are also correct that if the target doesn't run an HTTP server it will take a long time - hence I wrote "URL to a known image"... Also caching is an issue. This was a simple demonstration of an approach you could take, same principle as CSS history hacks. Thanks for the downvote. –  Dennis G Feb 10 '11 at 10:26
    
Don't take the downvote personally, I didn't downvote you; I just felt that it doesn't really answer the question - although it is a simple way of checking if a known HTTP server might be up, it doesn't really answer the ping loss or latency. I agree that my approach is not pinging from the client's computer, that would require a lot of lowered permissions and many security holes (and ActiveX). –  Piskvor Feb 10 '11 at 11:11
    
Not taking it personally :-) Thanks for the follow-up –  Dennis G Feb 10 '11 at 15:35
1  
Warning: The above will cache. Be sure to append something unique to the end of the URL. Also, a lone IP/Domain will work just as well for the image src: "http://" + ipOrHost + "?pingedat=" + new Date().getTime();. –  faraz Sep 30 '12 at 21:40
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function ping(url){
 new Image().src=url
}

Above pings the given Url.
Generally used for counters / analytics.
It won't encounter failed responses to client(javascript)

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The closest you're going to get to a ping in JS is using AJAX, and retrieving the readystates, status, and headers. Something like this:

url = "<whatever you want to ping>"
ping = new XMLHttpRequest();    
ping.onreadystatechange = function(){

    document.body.innerHTML += "</br>" + ping.readyState;

    if(ping.readyState == 4){
        if(ping.status == 200){
            result = ping.getAllResponseHeaders();
            document.body.innerHTML += "</br>" + result + "</br>";
        }
    }

}
ping.open("GET", url, true);    
ping.send();

Of course you can also put conditions in for different http statuses, and make the output display however you want with descriptions etc, to make it look nicer. More of an http url status checker than a ping, but same idea really. You can always loop it a few times to make it feel more like a ping for you too :)

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