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I've got two tables :

TEST1 :

id int, value int, parentId int

and TEST2:

id int, value int, parentId int

In TEST1, I've got following records:

 id  value  parentId
 1   0      1
 2   0      1
 3   0      1

in TEST2, I've got:

id  value  parentId
1   0      1

I want to update the two tables in one update using multiple table feature. The goal is to add +1 value to each records of TEST1 and +1 value to the record in TEST2 where the parentId is similar to TEST1.

My query is :

UPDATE TEST1 t1
LEFT OUTER JOIN TEST2 t2 ON t1.parentId=t2.parentId
SET t1.value = t1.value + 1,
    t2.value = t2.value + 1;

After that, I do a select to check that values of TEST1 have been updated :

SELECT * FROM TEST1;

It gives me :

id  value  parentId
1   1      1
2   1      1
3   1      1

I check TEST2 :

SELECT * FROM TEST2;

It gives me :

id  value  parentId
1   1      1

What I find strange is that the record of TEST2 has a value of 1. I would expect 3 because the update of TEST1 is on 3 records and so the update of TEST2 should occurs three times on the same record.

Why I obtain 1 instead of 3 ? and What is the correct query to obtain 3 ?

EDIT: I've also tried :

SET @var=1;

UPDATE TEST1 t1
LEFT OUTER JOIN TEST2 t2 ON t1.parentId=t2.parentId
SET t1.value = t1.value + 1,
    t2.value = (@var:= @var + 1);

After this query, t2.value is equal to 2 ! And not 4 as I would expect.

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3 Answers 3

please try RIGHT OUTER JOIN instead OF LEFT OUT

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Thanks for your answer but I've just tried and this does not change anything. –  Jerome Cance Feb 10 '11 at 12:02

Maybe I'm wrong here, but until the query is complete your update statement will be seeing t1.value as 0 (because your query hasn't completed execution), which is expected behaviour is it not?

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Sure it is the case but I don't want this behavior, that is the problem ;) –  Jerome Cance Feb 10 '11 at 13:41

this will do what you want.
It's joining TEST1 and TEST2 as you did.
Additional join on a subquery named agg with a sum aggregation over TEST1.

UPDATE TEST1 t1
LEFT OUTER JOIN TEST2 t2 ON t1.parentId=t2.parentId
LEFT OUTER JOIN (
  SELECT 
    parentId,
    sum(value) AS sum_v
  FROM TEST1
  GROUP BY parentId
) agg ON t1.parentId=agg.parentId
SET t1.value = t1.value + 1,
    t2.value = t2.value + agg.sum_v;
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I used LEFT OUTER JOIN as the example started with this. Actually I think it could be all INNER JOIN –  bw_üezi Feb 10 '11 at 13:19
    
I can't do this because in my real case I use column and not 1. Example: UPDATE TEST1 t1 LEFT OUTER JOIN TEST2 t2 ON t1.parentId=t2.parentId SET t1.value = t1.value + 1, t2.value = t2.value + t1.value; –  Jerome Cance Feb 10 '11 at 13:40
    
@Jerome: I changes count aggregation to sum. from the example it was not clear if you mean 1*3 or 1+1+1. Does this do the trick? –  bw_üezi Feb 10 '11 at 13:54

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