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I am having following simple program from scott meyers book. I am compiling using Visual studio 2009.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;


class Top {  };

class Middle: public Top {  };

class Bottom: public Middle {  };



template<typename T>

class SmartPtr {

public:

    template<typename U>

    SmartPtr(const SmartPtr<U>& other) : heldPtr(other.get()) { }

    T* get() const { return heldPtr; }


private:

    // built-in pointer held

    T *heldPtr;

};



int main()
{
    SmartPtr<Top> pt1 = SmartPtr<Middle>(new Middle); //  SmartPtr<Top>
}

During compilation i am getting following error

1>d:\technical\c++study\addressconv.cpp(36) : error C2440: '<function-style-cast>' : cannot convert from 'Middle *' to 'SmartPtr<T>'
1>        with
1>        [
1>            T=Middle
1>        ]
1>        No constructor could take the source type, or constructor overload resolution was ambiguous
1>d:\technical\c++study\readparsing\readparsing\addressconv.cpp(36) : error C2512: 'SmartPtr<T>' : no appropriate default constructor available
1>        with
1>        [
1>            T=Top
1>        ]

Kindly request to help in resolving problem. What is root cause of problem?

Thanks!

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1  
1) why do you need to templatize the copy constructor? 2) what should your smart pointer do? 3) just use one of the boost pointers: boost smart pointers depending with your needs –  Yuval Feb 10 '11 at 13:42
    
i am trying to compile scott meyers suggetion use member function templates to accept all compatible types and also trying to understand concept in boost smart pointers –  venkysmarty Feb 10 '11 at 13:47
1  
@Yuval 1)Templatized copy contructor is to allow a base-class SmartPtr class to be able to behave as a normal pointer where it can point to a derived class instance. 2) It should behave as a normal pointer in almost all usage and assure the programmer that the pointer will be deleted when it's no longer in use. 3) He could, but I believe he wants to learn by trying something new. Probably along the lines he might find a better solution or end up using Boost. But why restrict him from trying? Boost is a heavy dependency anyway. –  Vite Falcon Feb 10 '11 at 13:53
    
@Vite: Boost is a heavy dependency ... on the other hand, Boost is merely a collection of libraries, pick what you want, discard the rest. –  Matthieu M. Feb 10 '11 at 16:32
    
@Matthie: Consider this to be a small utility library, does it make sense to rely on a big library like boost? It would make more sense if it were an application or a big library. Well, it would still make sense for small library but I guess if you could get the same effect with a single header file, why bother with boost at all? To an extent it comes to user preference. But my point was that there is no harm in the OP trying to create a SmartPtr. You can clearly see it's more like a study into SmartPtr from his folder structure... d:\technical\c++study\addressconv.cpp(36) : error C2440... –  Vite Falcon Feb 10 '11 at 16:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First of all, create two copy constructors. One to accept the same type and the other to accept any other type that can be dynamically casted to the base type. Here's what I mean.

template<typename T>
class SmartPointer
{
    // No dynamic_cast and hence no overhead
    SmartPointer(const SmartPointer<T>& other):heldPtr(other.heldPtr){}

    // Has dynamic_cast'ing
    template<typename U>
    SmartPointer(const SmartPointer<U>& other):heldPtr(dynamic_cast<T*>(other.get())){}

    // Rest of the code
}

Do keep in mind that according to your code, the base class pointer is not keeping the same reference count as the derived class SmartPtr. Which mean if either the base-class or derived-class SmartPtr goes out of scope, the pointer will become invalid.

EDIT: This definitely works. The basic issue was there wasn't a constructor that took a pointer as argument to create a SmartPtr. Here's the working code.

class Top
{
public:
    virtual ~Top(){}
};

class Middle: public Top
{
public:
    virtual ~Middle(){}
};

class Bottom: public Middle
{
};


template < typename T >
class SmartPtr
{
public:

    explicit SmartPtr(T* ptr):heldPtr(ptr){}

    SmartPtr(const SmartPtr<T>& other) : heldPtr(other.heldPtr){}

    template<typename U>
    SmartPtr(const SmartPtr<U>& other) : heldPtr(dynamic_cast<T*>(other.get())) { }

    T* get() const { return heldPtr; }

private:

    // built-in pointer held

    T *heldPtr;

};

I hope this helps. I also made the destructors of the base classes dynamic because that's required of any classes that are intended to be inherited.

share|improve this answer
    
still it is not compiling –  venkysmarty Feb 10 '11 at 13:57
    
This doesn't help with the compile errors that @user519882 is getting. The problem is the lack of constructor that takes a raw pointer type, not with constructors that take other SmartPointer specializations. –  Charles Bailey Feb 10 '11 at 14:07
    
@Charles: I believe he IS using a derived-class SmartPointer rather than raw-pointer. Atleast that's what I see in his example. The reason he gets that error is the lack of any casting operation in his copy constructor. –  Vite Falcon Feb 10 '11 at 14:37
    
My comment applied to your answer before your edit. –  Charles Bailey Feb 10 '11 at 15:16
    
@Charles: The edit was to add a working code sample and i didn't edit my original post only added to the end of it. –  Vite Falcon Feb 10 '11 at 16:43

You need to implement a constructor that accepts a U*. It's complaining that it cannot explicitly convert a U* to a SmartPtr<U>.

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how can we do this? can you please eloborate and show example? –  venkysmarty Feb 10 '11 at 13:45
    
First, SO isn't a code factory. But secondly, your smart ptr implementation isn't complete enough for me to write your code anyway. My suggestion is "just code it yourself", and if you don't know where to start, spend more time considering the design, thinking about how it should work, and maybe looking at other implementations. Admittedly though existing implementations are probably going to look a bit like spaghetti. Stick to simple ones. –  tenfour Feb 10 '11 at 13:48
    
You should drop the word "implicit", the conversion (a function style case) is explicit; the error is that even this explicit conversion is not allowed. –  Charles Bailey Feb 10 '11 at 14:04
    
thanks - edited. –  tenfour Feb 10 '11 at 14:09
SmartPtr<Top> pt1 = SmartPtr<Middle>(new Middle()); //  SmartPtr<Top>
                                               ^^
share|improve this answer
    
don't we have to specify type? –  venkysmarty Feb 10 '11 at 13:46
    
new Middle() vs new Middle is purely an initialization choice. It has no bearing on the compile error. –  Charles Bailey Feb 10 '11 at 14:03
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;



class Top {  };

class Middle: public Top {  };

class Bottom: public Middle {  };



template<typename T>
class SmartPtr {
public:

    SmartPtr(T* other):heldPtr(other){}

    SmartPtr(const SmartPtr<T>& other):heldPtr(other.heldPtr){} 

    template<typename U>
    SmartPtr(const SmartPtr<U>& other) // initialize this held ptr
        : heldPtr(other.get()) { } // with other’s held ptr

    T* get() const { return heldPtr; }

private: 
    // built-in pointer held
    T *heldPtr; // by the SmartPtr
};


int main()
{
    SmartPtr<Top> pt1 = SmartPtr<Middle>(new Middle()); //  SmartPtr<Top>
}
share|improve this answer

The error you have is simple: there is no constructor of SmartPtr taking a simple T* (or U*) as a parameter. Add the following:

template <typename U>
SmartPtr(U* ptr): heldPtr(ptr) {}

and your code should compile.

With regard to the copying constructors: make sure you either transmit ownership or implement reference counting, otherwise you'll be in trouble.

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