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UPDATE table1 
       SET col1 = 'Y'
     WHERE col2 in (select col2 from table2)

In the above query, imagine the inner query returns 10000 rows. Does this query with IN clause affect performance?

If so, what can be done for faster execution?

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If the sub-query returns 10000 results the runtime will be zero as it throws an error. I assume you want to write IN instead of = for the subselect? –  a_horse_with_no_name Feb 10 '11 at 14:03
    
You got it. I have made the change, thank u. –  Vivek Feb 10 '11 at 14:06
1  
if the answer provided by @zerkms was helpful for you please accept it. Check the FAQ to know why you should do this. :-) –  Guillem Vicens Feb 10 '11 at 14:10

4 Answers 4

if the subquery returns a large number of rows compared to the number of rows in TABLE1, the optimizer will likely produce a plan like this:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation           | Name   | Rows  | Bytes |TempSpc| Cost (%CPU)| Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | UPDATE STATEMENT    |        |   300K|    24M|       |  1581   (1)| 00:0
|   1 |  UPDATE             | TABLE1 |       |       |       |            |
|*  2 |   HASH JOIN SEMI    |        |   300K|    24M|  9384K|  1581   (1)| 00:0
|   3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| TABLE1 |   300K|  5860K|       |   355   (2)| 00:0
|   4 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| TABLE2 |   168K|    10M|       |   144   (2)| 00:0
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   2 - access("COL2"="COL2")

It will scan both tables once and update only the rows in TABLE1 common to both tables. This is a highly efficient plan if you need to update lots of rows.

Sometimes the inner query will have few rows compared to the number of rows in TABLE1. If you have an index on TABLE1(col2), you could then obtain a plan similar to this one:

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation            | Name   | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | UPDATE STATEMENT     |        |    93 |  4557 |   247   (1)| 00:00:03 |
|   1 |  UPDATE              | TABLE1 |       |       |            |          |
|   2 |   NESTED LOOPS       |        |    93 |  4557 |   247   (1)| 00:00:03 |
|   3 |    SORT UNIQUE       |        |    51 |  1326 |   142   (0)| 00:00:02 |
|   4 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL| TABLE2 |    51 |  1326 |   142   (0)| 00:00:02 |
|*  5 |    INDEX RANGE SCAN  | IDX1   |     2 |    46 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   5 - access("T1"."COL2"="T2"."COL2")

In that case Oracle will read the rows from TABLE2 and for each (unique) row, perform an index access on TABLE1.

Which access is faster depend upon the selectivity of the inner query and the clustering of the index on TABLE1 (are the rows with similar value of col2 in TABLE1 next to each other or randomly spread?). In any case, performance wise, if you need to perform this update this query is one of the fastest way to do it.

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What about my query? ;-) Please, add an execution plan for one with EXISTS –  zerkms Feb 10 '11 at 14:58
1  
@zerkms: sorry I forgot to mention that IN subqueries are transformed into the equivalent EXIST subqueries by the optimizer. They therefore produce the same plan. I personnaly find IN statements more readable but this is highly subjective :) –  Vincent Malgrat Feb 10 '11 at 15:05
    
did not know that, thanks. –  zerkms Feb 10 '11 at 15:08
UPDATE table1 outer
   SET col1 = 'Y'
 WHERE EXISTS (select null
                 from table2
                WHERE col2 = outer.col2)

This could be better

To get the idea which is better - look at the execution plan.

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2  
I thought this was a solved problem in that for the Oracle optimizer there is usually no difference between IN and EXISTS and one will be converted to the other as appropriate. blogs.oracle.com/optimizer/2010/09/… –  Mike Meyers Feb 10 '11 at 15:05

From Oracle:

11.5.3.4 Use of EXISTS versus IN for Subqueries

In certain circumstances, it is better to use IN rather than EXISTS. In general, if the selective predicate is in the subquery, then use IN. If the selective predicate is in the parent query, then use EXISTS.

From my experience, I have seen better plans using EXISTS where subquery returns large amount of rows.

See here for more discussion from Oracle

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In my awareness, IN statment is transformed to OR statment, isn't it?

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