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I have modified the nerd dinner example to find locations in the vicinity of specified position. When selecting from a flat table performance is good, but I wanted to split up the tables so I have a generic coordinates table (SDB_Geography) and also join in a table with specific data for what i call the entity type (HB_Entity).

I have made a new model called HbEntityModel which stores entity, hb and geography "sub models". Now the problem is that this query takes around 5 seconds to execute. I figured I would get a slight performance decrease by doing this but 5 seconds is just ridiculous. Any ideas on how to improve the performance with currrent table setup or do i have to go back to a monstrous flat table?

public IEnumerable<HbEntityModel> FindByLocation(float latitude, float longitude) 
{
    return (from entity in db.SDB_Entity.AsEnumerable()
                join nearest in NearestEntities(latitude, longitude, 2) 
                on entity.EntityId equals nearest.EntityId
                join hb in db.HB_Entity
                on entity.EntityId equals hb.EntityId
                join geo in db.SDB_Geography
                on entity.GeographyId equals geo.GeographyId
                select new HbEntityModel(entity, hb, geo)).AsEnumerable();
}

UPDATE

All tables contains around 14000 records.

SDB_Entity 1:0/1 SDB_Geography

SDB_Entity 1:0/1 HB_Entity

The search yields around 70 HbEntityModels.

If selecting from single table the same query takes 0.3s, using IQueryable instead of IEnumerable.

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2  
Why the first .AsEnumerable()? You're doing the whole thing in object space. No surprise it's slow - you've just downloaded 4 tables into memory. –  Craig Stuntz Feb 10 '11 at 21:40
    
If i don't have the first AsEnumerable i get "Only parameterless constructors and initializers are supported in LINQ to Entities." –  Malako Feb 11 '11 at 6:38
    
Yes, but you only need that on the results of the join, not the input. –  Craig Stuntz Feb 11 '11 at 14:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found out how to do it with some help from Robban". See this post.

I rewrote the function to use a parameterless constructor and could then use IQueryable.

        public IQueryable<HbEntityModel> FindByLocation(float latitude, float longitude) 
    {
        return (from entity in db.SDB_Entity
                    join nearest in NearestEntities(latitude, longitude, 2) 
                    on entity.EntityId equals nearest.EntityId
                    join hb in db.HB_Entity
                    on entity.EntityId equals hb.EntityId
                    join geo in db.SDB_Geography
                    on entity.GeographyId equals geo.GeographyId
                    select new HbEntityModel() { Shared=entity, Specific=hb, Geography=geo }).AsQueryable();
    }

The query now takes around 0.4 seconds to execute which is somewhat acceptable. Hopefully things will be faster when my mean machine arrives. If someone could give me hints on how to improve the query, use a stored procedure or setup some index, i would be more than grateful.

share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't need a stored proc at all but i would suggest profiling it to see the query thats executed, also checkout the execution plan. –  Phill Feb 11 '11 at 8:46
    
Thanks for the advice. I will look into it later as i need to get things up and running by the end of next week. This is not a show stopper anymore. –  Malako Feb 11 '11 at 9:57

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