Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is what I want to do:

enum MyEnum
{
    ONE = 1, TWO, THREE
};

template<class T>
void func()
{
    cout << T::TWO << endl;
}

int main()
{
    func<MyEnum>();
};

It works, but I get a warning: "warning C4482: nonstandard extension used: enum 'MyEnum' used in qualified name"

How can I do this without getting the warning

share|improve this question
1  
enum E1 { ONE, TWO }; enum E2 { ONE, TWO }; gives "conflicting declaration of ONE" as I'd expect - values of enum E1 don't go into a namespace E1. What are you expecting? –  delnan Feb 10 '11 at 14:11
1  
TWO is defined in your MyEnum, which is not a part of a class or namespace in what you have shown. enum's do not declare a scope and thus, do not resolve using the scope operator. –  Zac Howland Feb 10 '11 at 14:19
    
but this is what I want to do, I would like to be able to pass both E1 and E2 and get different values when I print it –  hidayat Feb 10 '11 at 14:20
    
Then you need to use a class or struct, not enum. –  Zac Howland Feb 10 '11 at 14:23
    
what compiler are you using? Pretty much every G++ compiler ive seen [linux and osx] would yield errors with T::TWO –  Foo Bah Feb 10 '11 at 14:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Enum is a little tricky here. The type ONE and TWO will be in the outer namespace. So adding the type to the name results in the warning. You could just remove the qualifier

template<class T>
void func()
{
    cout << TWO << endl;
}

Since the TWO is known in the outer namespace. You could also just move your enum to some sort of enclosing struct.

struct EnumContainer
{
    enum MyEnum
    {
        ONE = 1, TWO, THREE
    };
};

template<class T>
void func()
{
    std::cout << T::TWO << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    func<EnumContainer>();
};

Now the compiler should be fine.

share|improve this answer
    
"The type ONE and TWO will be in the outer namespace." - not types; in Standardese they're enumerators :-). –  Tony D Feb 10 '11 at 15:13
2  
in C++ you have enum struct MyEnum { ONE, TWO };, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B0x#Strongly_typed_enumerations –  Matthieu M. Feb 10 '11 at 17:14

Enums (pre C++0x) are treated like integral types.

In fact, the notation MyEnum::TWO is garbage: there is no class or namespace MyEnum. The names ONE, TWO, and THREE are brought into the namespace where the enum is defined [in this case, the global namespace].

You should get an error like TWO is not a member of MyEnum.

One way to emulate the behavior is to put it in a struct or class, like others have suggested.

share|improve this answer

While it would be nice to use the enum as the template parameter and have it recognize each individual enum separately as you've written it, it won't happen. Instead, may I suggest that you declare the following:

template<MyEnum T>
void func(){
    std::cout << T << std::endl;
}

The great thing about C++ is that the way templates are structured gives you a Turning complete system. Hence, you don't need a separate call like this, as you've declared to get each individual enum value. You can create a separate function for each value when you need it and only when you need it.

Now, getting to the other problem of your question, as @delnan commented, you can't have two different Enums with the same name. You can, however, have a class with a member variable called TWO such that:

struct Foo{
    int TWO;
};

struct Bar{
    int TWO;
};

template<typename T>
void func(){
    std::cout << T::TWO << std::endl;
}

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
He can also declare the enum as a member of the struct's so he could have the enum defined multiple times (in different scopes). Though I would question why that would be desirable in most circumstances. –  Zac Howland Feb 10 '11 at 14:26
    
I doubt this compiles. typename is used for types, TWO is an attribute which requires an instance of the class.... –  Matthieu M. Feb 10 '11 at 17:13
    
@Mathieu M. You're right, changed. –  wheaties Feb 10 '11 at 18:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.