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I'm trying to return a string by calling a function, but unfortunately my program just crashes when I attempt to do so. Here is my function:

char *course_comment(float b) 
{ 
   if(b < 2.0) 
     return("Retake"); 
}

I tried calling the function using printf formatting like this:

printf(" %s",course_comment(1.0) );

I dont know how to make it work. Moreover, I have several functions which attempt to do a similar thing, but none appear to work. How do I do it correctly?


EDIT: to other editors: Please don't change the original source code when trying to help someone. Feel free to reformat it, but don't add or remove characters from the source code.

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If that's really the whole function, you're not returning anything if b >= 2.0 (that's not your particular problem here, but it will be a problem at some point) –  Michael Mrozek Feb 10 '11 at 15:11
    
Works fine for me if I add a missing parenthesis. What goes wrong? –  larsmans Feb 10 '11 at 15:11
    
"it doesn't work" is quite broad when talking about C. Be more specific :) –  Aiden Bell Feb 10 '11 at 15:33
    
possible duplicate of how to return a string in my c code . –  Aiden Bell Feb 10 '11 at 15:36
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/4929329/… possible dupe, and there will be tons more I recon –  Aiden Bell Feb 10 '11 at 15:36

8 Answers 8

If your strings are constants and there is no intend to modify the result, then working with string literals is the best choice. Example:

#include <stdio.h>

static const char RETAKE_STR[] = "Retake";
static const char DONT_RETAKE_STR[] = "Don't retake";

const char *
course_comment (float b)
{
  return b < 2.0 ? RETAKE_STR : DONT_RETAKE_STR;
}

int main()
{
  printf ("%s or... %s?\n",
      course_comment (1.0), 
      course_comment (3.0));
  return 0;
}

Otherwise, you can use strdup to clone the string. But in that case don't forget to free it. Example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *
course_comment (float b)
{
  char result[256];

  if (b < 2.0)
    {
      snprintf (result, sizeof (result), "Retake %f", b);
    }
  else
    {
      snprintf (result, sizeof (result), "Do not retake %f", b);
    }
  return strdup (result);
}

int main()
{
  char *comment;

  comment = course_comment (1.0);
  printf ("Result: %s\n", comment);
  free (comment); // Don't forget to free the memory!

  comment = course_comment (3.0);
  printf ("Result: %s\n", comment);
  free (comment); // Don't forget to free the memory!

  return 0;
}

Hope it helps. Good luck!

share|improve this answer

You should probably return a literal as const char * as they cannot be modified.

what does your function return if b is not less than 2.0? what do you think would happen if you tried to use the return value? Is your exact code what is crashing?

share|improve this answer
    
He's calling it and passing 1.0, so this isn't the problem –  Michael Mrozek Feb 10 '11 at 15:14

Depending on the order / structure of your program when 'course_comment' is first called - it maybe be undeclared & C will default its return type to an 'int'. Check for compiler warnings when you err.. compile.

Also make sure you understand about function prototypes, when & where they should be used (everywhere basically). I think the 'f' missing on the 1.0 means the argument will be auto cast to an int.

This works - not that I would ever do this:

#include <stdio.h>

const char *course_comment(float b); // <- fn prototype


int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

    printf(" %s",course_comment(1.0f));


}


const char *course_comment(float b) 
{ 
   if(b < 2.0) 
     return("Retake"); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
A good answer, in fact the only one here that isn't crap. –  Jim Balter Feb 11 '11 at 6:09

see this answer

As other said add an else with some return value ... And tell us exactly what the error is, please !

my2c

share|improve this answer

because your getting a NULL-pointer since 1.0 doesn't return anything.

Not your function crashes, printf crashes with:

printf(" %s", NULL);

Rule Of Thumb:

  • always have a defined return
  • gcc -Wall shows you all warnings
share|improve this answer
1  
but but but ... 1.0 < 2.0 is TRUE, so it should return. What's the problem? I agree it needs a alternate path for the other return, but what's wrong with the logic of that function when b < 2.0? –  jcolebrand Feb 10 '11 at 15:39
    
This is not true. 1.0 < 2.0 ? See other answers. –  David Victor Feb 10 '11 at 16:21

Return a pointer like that isn't particularly pretty. The least evil thing you can do is something like this:

main.c

#include "some_other_file.h"

int main()
{
  printf(" %s", course_comment(1.0f) );
  return 0;
}

some_other_file.h

#ifndef YADA_YADA_H
#define YADA_YADA_H 

const char* course_comment(float b);

#endif

some_other_file.c

static const char COMMENT_RETAKE [] = "Retake";



const char* course_comment(float b) 
{ 
  const char* result;


  if(b < 2.0f)
  {
    result = COMMENT_RETAKE;
  }
  else
  {
    result = ""; /* empty string */
  }

  return result;
}

Please note that you should use 1.0f notation when dealing with floats, and 1.0 notation when dealing with doubles. Otherwise the compiler will do silent promotions of your variables to double, and the code will turn slower.

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If you want to return a string literal like return "blah", return type should be const char*.

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't need to be, it just should be. It wouldn't be causing this problem –  Michael Mrozek Feb 10 '11 at 15:13
    
This is not strictly the case. It is legal in C to put a string literal in a char *; you just can't write to it –  bdonlan Feb 10 '11 at 15:15
    
I agree it doesn't really need to be but it's just asking for trouble not to do so. –  Eric Fortin Feb 10 '11 at 15:17
    
Fixed answer to remove needs to. –  Eric Fortin Feb 10 '11 at 15:33

Your function doesn't return anything if b > 2.0. You're missing the default return.

char *course_comment(float b) 
{ 
   if(b < 2.0) return("Retake");

   return "blablabla";
}
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