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I have the following scenario:

 using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required, new TransactionOptions { IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted },EnterpriseServicesInteropOption.Automatic))
 {
  using (DataContext db = new DataContext())
  {
    db.Connection.Open();
    db.Transaction = db.Connection.BeginTransaction();
    try
    {
      bool outcome = InvokeInTransaction<string, object>(inputDict, out outputDict);
      db.Transaction.Commit();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
      response.Outcome = BusinessEntityResponse.SystemError;
      db.Transaction.Rollback();
    }
  }
}

Inside the InvokeInTransaction call are a number of calls made to a LTS repository to perform various data changes. The problem is that inside the repository there is another

using (var db = new DataContext())

Inside which is the persistence code. Inspecting the context in the repository shows Transaction = null and I suspect that the "inner" context has no knowledge of the Ambient transaction. Can this be done? I understand that EF manages this under the covers, and the constraint is that the repository code cannot be changed. Any help?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

We use LinqToSql and TransactionScope for multiple database transactions. You should really control your connection/context/transaction lifecycles if you're going to attempt it.

  • We control DataContext instances by the rule: If you new one up, you do that with a using statement.
  • We control connection lifecycles by the rule: If you open it, you must close it (but generally let the DataContext instances manage that).
  • We control transaction lifecycles by the rule: let DataContext manage what goes on in SubmitChanges and let TransactionScope manage what goes on within its using block.

Here's a code sample:

using (OuterDataContext outerDataContext = GetOuterDataContext())
{
  using (InnerDataContext innerDataContext = GetInnerDataContext())
  {
    try
    {
      OuterRepository outerRepository = new OuterRepository();
        // may read records into memory for updating/deleting.
      outerRepository.WorkWithOuterRecords(outerRecords, outerDataContext);

      InnerRepository innerRepository = new InnerRepository();
        // may read records into memory for updating/deleting.
      innerRepository.WorkWithInnerRecords(innerRecords, innerDataContext);

      using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
      {
          //starts a local tranaction in outerDB, held open by scope
        outerDataContext.SubmitChanges();  
          //promotes the transaction to distributed, still held open by scope
        innerDataContext.SubmitChanges();
          // and done
        scope.Complete();
      }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
       LoggerClient.Log(ex);
       response.Message = "It didn't save anything.";
    }
  }
}
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Thanks David, this pattern certainly looks a good implementation, I like the WorkWith*Records as a means of maintaining the contextual scope, I simply am not able to get around my brown field implementation of the repository classes (too much refactoring to do on callers to those classes). Hence the original question. Nice pattern though.. –  OldBoy Feb 12 '11 at 13:39
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