Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a cube defined as :

  float vertices[] = {
            //Vertices according to faces
                -1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, //Vertex 0
                1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f,  //v1
                -1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,  //v2
                1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,   //v3

                1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f,  //...
                1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f,         
                1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,
                1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f,

                1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f,
                -1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f,            
                1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f,
                -1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f,

                -1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f,
                -1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f,         
                -1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f,
                -1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,

                -1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f,
                1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f,         
                -1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f,
                1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f,

                -1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,
                1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,           
                -1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f,
                1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f,
                                    };

What are the normals for this cube? I need the actual values for the normals.

Do we need 6 or 12 normals? Since OpenGL ES uses only triangles which means we need 12 normals but I could be wrong.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

The normal of a surface is simply a direction vector. Since the normal will be the same for two surfaces that are coplanar, you will only need 6 surface normals. However, often, it's the case that normals are expected to be defined per vertex, in which case you'll need 36 (one for each vertex of each triangle on each face of the cube).

To compute the normals, simply use the following calculation: http://www.opengl.org/wiki/Calculating_a_Surface_Normal

share|improve this answer
1  
24 (6x4) vertices should be enough for a cube, 36 is too much. –  rotoglup Feb 11 '11 at 22:47
1  
Well, it depends on how you define it. If you have 2 triangles per face, rather than a single quad, as was described in the question, then you need 36. –  jwir3 Feb 11 '11 at 23:42
1  
But the triangles can still reuse vertices –  PawelP Oct 10 at 17:19

Normals are specified per-vertex, and since the normals for the three faces that share each vertex are orthogonal, you'll get some really wonky looking results by specifying a cube with just 8 vertices and averaging the three face normals to get the vertex normal. It'll be shaded as a sphere, but shaped like a cube.

You'll instead need to specify 24 vertices, so each face of the cube is drawn without sharing vertices with any other.

As to the values, 'tis dead easy. If we assume that x increases to the right, y increases as we go up, and z increases as we move forwards, the normal for the right-hand side is (1, 0, 0), left is (-1, 0, 0), top side is (0,1,0), etc, etc

To summarise: don't draw a cube, draw 6 quads that just happen to have coincident vertices

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.