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I have a database, that stores items and a link to an image for every item. Now the images can't be storen localy (there wouldn't be anough space and other reasons as well), so I link to images on other servers.

When I wan't to display the items (with it's image), I run while statement with mysql_fetch_array like this (simplified):

$result = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM items");

while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)) {

echo "<h1>".$row['name']."</h1>";
echo "<img width='200' src='".$row['img']."' />";

}

But the image load takes forever, because some of the external images have large sizes, however I only need it 200px wide.

Is there a way to smaller the image 'on the go', or something to speed the loading up?

(Using php/html)

Thanks, Mike.

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1  
The image on the other servers... are they your servers? If that's the case, you could create thumbnail versions of the images and source from those instead. –  PureForm Feb 10 '11 at 16:28
    
No, they are not and they can change any time, so it's not possible to create thumnails before. =/ –  Mike Feb 10 '11 at 16:31
    
In that case, if you have rights to scrape the images, you can grab them from their servers, resize and put them on amazon S3. It should be fairly trivial with lines of php. –  PureForm Feb 10 '11 at 16:38
    
this question has definitely nothing to do with PHP –  Your Common Sense Feb 10 '11 at 17:00
    
Amazon S3 shouldn't be an option for a small project, right? –  apx Feb 10 '11 at 17:00

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

There is no direct way of resizing the images on the fly since it will require a lot of CPU computations, so it is just simpler to serve the full res image and let the browser resize it.

If you decide you want to resize the images on the server and then server lower res images, you can use this PHP class. I it pretty simple to use and works pretty fast.

Hope this helps.

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Anything you do "on the go" will be even slower, since for you to resize the image you have to first download it.

You can resize the image and save a smaller version, doing so is pretty straightforward. There are plenty of examples in the documentation and comments here.

But you only get a benefit out of it if you save the smaller images and serve them from your server (or from somewhere else you can put them, like Amazon S3) on future requests.

You can write a quick script which makes a smaller version of every image your database references offline then start serving them instead of writing <img> tags pointing to the remote versions.

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No.

The image is a certain (file) size, and it is stored somewhere that you don't control.

In order to reduce the size, you have to transfer the data to somewhere you do control — and that takes more or less the same time as it would take to transfer to the browser (after which you have to spent time editing the image, and then time transferring it to the browser).

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