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I've got a weird situation where my MySQL query is taking forever. I've fixed it by adding an explicit "USE INDEX" statement. My question really is why is this necessary - and what caused the MySQL optimiser to go so drastically wrong.

Here's the SQL statement:

SELECT i._id
FROM interim_table i
JOIN tablea a ON i.table_a_id = a._id
JOIN tableb b ON i.table_b_id = b._id
JOIN levels l ON a.level_id = l._id
JOIN projects p ON a.project_id = p._id
WHERE s.time_stamp > NOW() - INTERVAL 5 DAY AND a.project_id = 13

Note the time_stamp in the WHERE clause. If it's set to 5 days, then the query takes about two seconds. If I change it to 6 days however, it takes that long that MySQL times out.

This is the "explain" results for using the "5 day" interval (which takes 2 seconds):

id   select_type   table   type    possible_keys                    key                key_len   ref            rows  Extra
1    SIMPLE        p       const   PRIMARY                          PRIMARY            4         const          1     Using index
1    SIMPLE        b       range   PRIMARY, time_stamp              time_stamp         8                        479   Using where; Using index
1    SIMPLE        i       ref     ind_tableb_id,int_tablea_id      ind_tableb_id      4         b._id          11   
1    SIMPLE        a       eq_ref  PRIMARY,level_id,project_id      PRIMARY            4         i.table_a_id   1     Using where
1    SIMPLE        l       eq_ref  PRIMARY                          PRIMARY            4         a.level_id     1     Using index

This is the "explain" results for using the "6 day" interval (which times out):

id   select_type   table   type    possible_keys                    key              key_len     ref                       rows   Extra
1    SIMPLE        p       const   PRIMARY                          PRIMARY          4           const                     1      Using index
1    SIMPLE        a       ref     PRIMARY,level_id,project_id      project_id       4           const                     2722                          
1    SIMPLE        l       eq_ref  PRIMARY                          PRIMARY          4           a.level_id     1      Using index
1    SIMPLE        i       ref     ind_tableb_id,int_tablea_id      int_tablea_id    4           a._id          2                          
1    SIMPLE        b       eq_ref  PRIMARY,time_stamp               PRIMARY          4           i.table_b_id   1      Using where

If I put an explicit "USE INDEX" statement in there, then I get the 6 day interval also down to 2 seconds...

SELECT i._id
FROM interim_table i
JOIN tablea a ON i.table_a_id = a._id
JOIN tableb b USE INDEX (time_stamp) ON i.table_b_id = b._id
JOIN levels l ON a.level_id = l._id
JOIN projects p ON a.project_id = p._id
WHERE s.time_stamp > NOW() - INTERVAL 6 DAY AND a.project_id = 13

Then the explain results becomes:

id   select_type  table  type     possible_keys                  key             key_len  ref            rows    Extra
1    SIMPLE       p      const    PRIMARY                        PRIMARY         4        const          1       Using index
1    SIMPLE       s      range    time_stamp                     time_stamp      8                       504     Using where; Using index
1    SIMPLE       i      ref      ind_tableb_id,ind_tableaid     ind_tableb_id   4        s._id          11                            
1    SIMPLE       v      eq_ref   PRIMARY,level_id,project_id    PRIMARY         4        i.table_a_id   1       Using where
1    SIMPLE       l      eq_ref   PRIMARY                        PRIMARY         4        v.level_id     1       Using index

Any thoughts on why MySQL required me to tell it which index to use?

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1  
have you tried to update statistics? –  maximdim Feb 10 '11 at 16:30
    
can you post query plans? –  BertuPG Feb 10 '11 at 16:33
2  
As @maximdim said, make sure the stats are up to date, run OPTIMIZE TABLE on that table. The query planner does some guesstimating at how many rows it will have to look at with each plan, and sometimes decides that if it's going to have to scan almost the whole table to produce your result set, it should skip using the index to find the rows and just find them while reading the whole table to produce the results. –  Dan Grossman Feb 10 '11 at 16:35
    
Ah, that's fixed it. I thought I had done this earlier today, but I must have missed an important table! If you post this as an answer, then I'll mark it as the answer. –  Dan Feb 10 '11 at 16:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have you tried to update statistics?

Posting it again as an answer :)

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