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I'm new to Android dev and I'm almost ready to release a first version of my app :)

While testing the signed release apk on my phone, it refuse to install because the debug version is installed with the debug signature.

So I have to uninstall the debug version but it delete all my database (and it will do it to my friends who are testing it).

Is there a way to manage a debug and a release version of the same app without losing data?

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I'd be very interested in a solution for this too. However, I'm fairly certain that short of changing the package names, this won't be possible. :/ –  Victor Feb 10 '11 at 17:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not aware of any easy way to do get around the uninstall/reinstall process, so your options include...

  • Buy a second device for testing (some Android devices are very cheap now, especially on eBay)
  • Use the emulator for testing

I see the same issue, but it's to be expected, so I use the phone for debug dev, and the tablet for production testing. When I'm close to a release, I test the production version on both devices and the emulator.

With your testers, I'd advise that you always give them release versions, but you could include extensive logging to help with problems. Debug versions are then only used by you, and release versions by them. If you provide testers with a release version, they use, and accumulate data, when they come to upgrade to the next version, the data can be retained (or updated, if you change the schema) to migrate their data.

I don't see a need for your testers to be using debug & release versions.

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it's because I provide a debug menu with some advanced actions only available when the app is signed wish debug signature –  Geobert Feb 10 '11 at 17:44
    
In that case I would suggest you add a boolean flag in your build for whether to include that menu or not, and put it in your production build. Another option is to "hide" it in the UI, perhaps as a long-press on the app logo, something most people won't do, but if you want specific people to have access to it, they can. Then when testing is finished, you do a proper production release and remove it. –  Ollie C Feb 10 '11 at 17:55
2  
@Geobert I think it's a bad idea to be sending debug builds to testers, much better to send them production releases. It gives them an experience closer to the end result, e.g. makes sure they're testing a version that's using the production MapView key, for example. Debug builds are for you, production for your testers and end-users –  Ollie C Feb 10 '11 at 18:04
    
ok I'll do this from now –  Geobert Feb 10 '11 at 18:11

Why uninstall the app? Normally, installing the new version of the same app (identified by the package ID) retains all the app data.

EDIT: to retain app data by hand, copy it from /data/data/my.package.name/... to a safe place, then restore when necessary.

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1  
The same app will be overwriting the old one while keeping the data, yes, but you can not install a second app with the same package, but a different signing, as @Geobert has. So that's what happens. –  Nanne Feb 10 '11 at 17:10
    
I did not change the package id but it does not install. I've uninstall the debug version then install the release one. Then when I tried to launch in debug mode from eclipse, it says: –  Geobert Feb 10 '11 at 17:11
    
[2011-02-10 18:11:24 - radis] Uploading radis.apk onto device '10006609c6cb' [2011-02-10 18:11:24 - radis] Installing radis.apk... [2011-02-10 18:11:25 - radis] Re-installation failed due to different application signatures. [2011-02-10 18:11:25 - radis] You must perform a full uninstall of the application. WARNING: This will remove the application data! [2011-02-10 18:11:25 - radis] Please execute 'adb uninstall fr.geobert.Radis' in a shell. [2011-02-10 18:11:25 - radis] Launch canceled! –  Geobert Feb 10 '11 at 17:12
1  
I think this is a bad solution - you should send production APKs to your testers and customers, otherwise they could give feedback, everything is ok, then you release the production build and you see problems. Your testers should be testing a version as close as possible to that you will finally release. –  Ollie C Feb 10 '11 at 18:06
1  
I kinda agree; in my case, the beta was signed by prod key, and the debugging features were well-hidden (activated by a cheat code in one of the input fields). Just answering the question. –  Seva Alekseyev Feb 10 '11 at 18:07

Many Android projects are starting to use the gradle build system (we transitioned to it when we started using Android Studio). Fortunately, gradle makes it really simple to install both a dev and release version simultaneously, each with their own independent data. The Android docs cover this, just add a packageNameSuffix to your debug build type like so:

android {
    buildTypes {
        debug {
            applicationIdSuffix ".debug"
        }
    }
}
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1  
Use applicationIdSuffix '.debug' instead, as packageNameSuffix has been depreciated. –  Jaydeep Oct 20 at 2:51
    
Thanks, @Jaydeep, I'll update the answer. –  Evan Grim Oct 20 at 20:41

Thanks @Evan your solution works perfect:

android {
    buildTypes {
        debug {
            applicationIdSuffix ".debug"
        }
    }
}

To append " (DEBUG)" to your app title when running in debug mode, place this code in your Activity's onCreate:

PackageInfo pInfo = getPackageManager().getPackageInfo(getPackageName(), 0);
    //The .debug specified in gradle
    if (pInfo.packageName.equals("YOUR_PACKAGE_NAME_HERE.debug")) {
        setTitle(getTitle() + " (DEBUG)");
}
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